Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund - Frequently Asked Questions

General

  1. How many intakes will there be for Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund?
  2. Infrastructure Canada expects there will be a minimum of two intakes. The first intake period closes on July 31, 2018, at 7 p.m. (Pacific Time).

  3. How do I apply to Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund?
  4. The Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund has a two-stage application process:

    • Step I: Expression of Interest
      • The Expression of Interest Application is a mandatory component of the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund application process. The Expression of Interest for the first intake was launched on May 17, 2018 and closes on July 31, 2018, at 7 p.m. (Pacific Time).
    • Step II: Full Application
      • Successful applicants under the Expression of Interest will be invited by Infrastructure Canada to submit a Full Application.

    Specific requirements for both Steps I and II can be found in the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund Applicant's Guide at:

    http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/dmaf-faac/dmaf-guide-faac-eng.html or http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/alt-format/pdf/dmaf-faac/DMAF-Applicant's-Guide.pdf

    In addition, you can email us for more information: infc.dmaf-faac.infc@canada.ca

  5. Is there a limit to the number of applications a proponent can submit?
  6. There is no limit to the number of applications a proponent can submit. Each Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund project requires a separate application, unless the projects are bundled (see Question 11). Your organization may have one point of contact for all applications submitted.

  7. How will projects be selected?
  8. The Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund is a competitive program, and projects will be assessed against a list of eligibility and merit criteria. Please see the Applicant's Guide for more details.In addition, projects can be considered outside of the competitive intake process in cases where the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, in consultation with the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada, identifies a specific area of concern due to urgent and emergent situations. These projects are still required to meet the eligibility requirements and be assessed against the same merit criteria as the projects submitted through the competitive process.

  9. Are there funding allocations for particular regions or provinces/territories?
  10. There are no funding allocations for regions and/or provinces/territories under the program. Applicants apply directly to Infrastructure Canada for funding, and projects will be selected through a competitive process.

  11. Is it possible to use provincial and municipal funding as other sources of project funds?
  12. Yes, it is possible to use any other sources of funds. The only requirement under the program is that the maximum federal stacking limits are respected. For federal stacking limits please see this link: http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/dmaf-faac/details-eng.html

  13. What type of data can be used for a Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund application?
  14. As part of the Full Application process, the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund proponents need to support their applications using the best available data and research, including historical and projected information, as well as Indigenous Traditional Knowledge, where available.

  15. When can applicants begin incurring costs?
  16. Following project approval, the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities will send an approval letter to successful applicants.

    Applicants can start incurring costs as of the date of the approval letter.

    Costs incurred prior to the date of this letter, as well as any and all expenditures related to contracts signed prior to the date of this letter, are ineligible for reimbursement (except for expenditures associated with Climate Lens assessment(s)).

    Claims can be submitted throughout the project implementation as eligible costs are incurred.

  17. When will successful applicants receive funding from the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund?
  18. The signed contribution agreement represents the final federal approval of the Project.

    Infrastructure Canada will reimburse claims as they are submitted after a contribution agreement is signed.

  19. What is the role of the Government of Canada after a project is approved?
  20. The Government of Canada is making a financial contribution to the recipient for the project. The Government will negotiate a contribution agreement with the recipient and an Oversight Committee co-chaired by federal and recipient officials will be established to monitor progress of the project and compliance with the terms and conditions of the contribution agreement.

    The Government will have no involvement in the implementation of the project or its operation. It is neither a decision-maker nor an administrator to the project.

  21. Does a municipality need council resolution when submitting an Expression of Interest?
  22. Infrastructure Canada does not specifically require municipal officials to demonstrate municipal council endorsement as part of the Expression of Interest. However, the Expression of Interest does request information about stakeholder engagement, budget details, and a requirement that the Expression of Interest be signed by an authorized senior official such as the Chief Financial Officer, Chief Administrative Officer, Chief Executive Officer, Certified Planner, and/or a Certified Engineer.

  23. What is project bundling and how does it work?
  24. Collaborating and working in partnership with other eligible recipients on projects under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund is allowed and encouraged. Bundling is the practice of combining related projects into one larger infrastructure project. In the context of the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund, eligible recipients can submit a project application that includes more than one mitigation and/or adaptation investment (e.g., a project comprising several sub-projects with a total value of more than $20 million in eligible costs).

    Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund project applications that undertake the bundling approach must demonstrate that each of the multiple mitigation /adaptation investments (e.g., projects) identified in the application work systematically to reduce the same risk within the same time period. As an example, for flooding, it should be projects within the same watershed or along the same body of water and within the same time period.

    Each project submitted under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund requires a separate Expression of Interest, unless the projects are bundled, in which case, only one (1) Expression of Interest is required.

    In cases where multiple applicants are collaborating to submit a bundled project, it is expected that one Applicant will be responsible for the application on behalf of the other Applicants.

    For more details on bundling fire break projects, please refer to question 21.

  25. Is funding for studies eligible under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund?
  26. The costs associated with standalone studies are not eligible for funding. Eligible expenditures are costs considered by Infrastructure Canada to be direct and necessary for the successful implementation of an eligible project. Eligible projects must consist of new construction of public infrastructure including natural infrastructure or modification and/or reinforcement including rehabilitation and expansion of existing public infrastructure including natural infrastructure. Eligible expenditures for approved projects may include design and planning, capital cost, as well as costs related to meeting specific program requirements, such as the Climate Lens assessment(s), as well as creating Community Employment Benefit plans.

  27. Is funding for provincial/territorial/municipal programs eligible under DMAF?
  28. Funding for programs is not eligible under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund.

  29. Are projects that have already started eligible?
  30. Projects where construction has started are not eligible. As well, expenditures incurred prior to the date of the approval letter, as well as any and all expenditures related to contracts signed prior to the date of this letter, are ineligible for reimbursement under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund.

  31. What is natural infrastructure?
  32. Natural infrastructure is the use of natural resources such as plants, soils and wetlands to reduce or mitigate the impact of climate change or natural hazards. Examples of natural infrastructure projects include wetlands for flood control and fire breaks to mitigate wildland fires.

  33. Is the acquisition of land eligible under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund?
  34. The acquisition of land is an eligible expenditure under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund only for natural infrastructure projects that mitigate against a natural hazard. The acquisition of land must be required to achieve a project's intended outcome (e.g., to preserve or enhance the land's natural capacity to withstand climate impacts). Protecting open spaces and sensitive natural areas using both land acquisition in and near developed spaces can mitigate flooding impacts for communities and improve the water quality. Natural areas that are particularly important in addressing water quality and flooding include riparian areas, wetlands, and steep hillsides.

    Eligibility for land acquisition expenditures will be conditional on the recipient submitting all of the requirements outlined in the Applicant's Guide.

  35. Are schools and hospitals eligible investments under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund?
  36. Schools and hospitals are not eligible for funding under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund.

  37. Are ports and airports eligible under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund?
  38. Locally owned airports and ports are eligible under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund.

  39. Is full or partial relocation of a community eligible under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund?
  40. The full relocation of entire communities is ineligible.

    The relocation of existing and vulnerable critical public infrastructure that provide essential services to Canadians would be eligible. These could include:

    • water, wastewater, and storm water systems (e.g., water supply, treatment, distribution);
    • solid waste systems;
    • power/energy systems;
    • transportation systems (e.g., ports, airports and railways and waterways);
    • flood control systems (e.g., dikes, seawalls);
    • cultural/heritage assets; and
    • any critical facility for public use or benefit such as climate-related shelters/community centres.
  41. What wildland fire investments are eligible under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund?
  42. Fire breaks, involving clearing land near assets, are considered a disaster mitigation investment and are eligible under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund. Emergency services and other disaster response investments are not eligible.

    A province or territory may bundle fire break projects across the entire province or territory. The province or territory may also work with a neighbouring province or territory.

Program Design

  1. What hazards can Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund projects address?
  2. Natural hazards under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund include: avalanches, droughts, earthquakes, erosion, extreme temperatures, floods, hurricanes, landslides, sea level rise, tornados, tsunamis, wildland fires, and storms. Projects that address technological and human-caused hazards are not eligible under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund.

  3. Why does the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund have a $20 million threshold for each project?
  4. The Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund was designed to target large-scale infrastructure projects and to complement the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program's Integrated Bilateral Agreements with provinces and territories. Adaptation and disaster mitigation projects below the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund's $20 million project threshold can be funded under the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program's Infrastructure Green Stream. Under the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program, provinces and territories are responsible for prioritizing projects.

  5. Is the $20 million total project cost or total federal contribution?
  6. Eligible projects must have a minimum of $20 million in total eligible project costs.

  7. What is the role of provinces and territories in the selection of the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund projects?
  8. Under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund, eligible recipients submit their applications directly to Infrastructure Canada for funding under the program. Following the Expression of Interest, Infrastructure Canada will share the list of projects with the respective province/territory whose role is to confirm compliance with the applicable legislation and regulations and alignment with their plans and strategies.

    Projects that are non-compliant with provincial/territorial legislation and regulations will not be considered.

  9. How will innovation be assessed for the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund projects?
  10. Under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund, innovation is defined as solutions and technology, including the use of natural infrastructure that result in better ways to manage increasing risks, including those related to climate change.

  11. How Does the Climate Lens Apply to DMAF projects?
  12. All projects under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund will require Climate Lens assessments. The Climate Lens is a process that involves two separate assessments:

    1. The Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Assessment measures the expected greenhouse gas emissions of an infrastructure project. For the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund, the Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Assessment will require proponents to measure the anticipated greenhouse gas emissions of an infrastructure project.
    2. The Climate Change Resilience Assessment measures how well new infrastructure can withstand potential impacts of climate change. For the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund, the Climate Change Resilience Assessment has been fully integrated within the Full Application.
  13. Are there any tools available that could facilitate the Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Assessment and the Climate Change Resilience Assessment?
  14. Regarding the Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Assessment, the Climate Lens General Guidance provides Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund Applicants with details on the requirements (Annex A) and related data (Annex C).

    The Climate Change Resilience Assessment is integrated in the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund application and is compatible with ISO 31000 on Risk Management.

    Under the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund, applicants are required to collect reliable data to support the hazard risk assessment and the related resilience assessment. Annex H of the Climate Lens General Guidance outlines some tools that could be helpful in assisting applicants with quantitative data to support the hazard risk assessment indicators under section H of the Applicant's Guide.

The Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund & the Investing in Canada Plan

  1. How does the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund relate to the Investing in Canada Plan and the Integrated Bilateral Agreements with provinces and territories?
  2. Under the $180 billion Investing in Canada Plan, the Government of Canada is signing new bilateral agreements with all provinces and territories. The Government of Canada is investing more than $33 billion in federal infrastructure funding through these bilateral agreements.

    The new funding will make transformational investments under four funding streams:

    • $20.1 billion for public transit;
    • $9.2 billion for green infrastructure;
    • $1.3 billion for community, cultural and recreational infrastructure; and
    • $2 billion for wide-ranging infrastructure needs in rural and northern communities.

    In addition, the $400 million Arctic Energy Fund is in place to support energy security in the territories.

    The Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund is another program under the Investing in Canada Plan to support the Government of Canada's objectives to create long-term economic growth, support a low carbon green economy, and build inclusive communities.

Climate Change

  1. What is the link between the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund and Climate Change?
  2. The objective of the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund is to strengthen the resilience of Canadian communities through investments in large-scale infrastructure projects, including natural infrastructure, to better withstand current and future risks such as floods, wildland fires, droughts, and seismic events as well as other natural disaster risks, and ensure continuity of essential services.

    The Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund is designed to address risks posed by natural hazards, including those made worse by the impact of climate change. Almost every jurisdiction in Canada has experienced significant weather-related events or disasters triggered by natural hazards over the past decade.

  3. How does the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund contribute to the objectives of the Pan-Canadian Framework for Clean Growth and Climate Change?
  4. The Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund will directly contribute to the objectives of the Pan-Canadian Framework by building climate resilience through infrastructure and reducing climate-related hazards and disaster risks.

Date modified: