2017-2018 Annual Report on the Administration of the Access to Information Act

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Introduction

THIS ANNUAL REPORT TO PARLIAMENT IS FOR THE 2017-2018 FISCAL YEAR, AS REQUIRED UNDER SUBSECTIONS 72(1) AND 72(2) OF THE ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT.

THE PURPOSE OF THE ACCESS TO INFORMATION ACT

The purpose of the Access to Information Act is to provide a right of access to information in records under the control of a government institution. The Act maintains that government information should be available to the public, necessary exceptions to the right of access should be limited and specific, and decisions on the disclosure of government information should be reviewed independently of government.

Section 72 of the Act requires the head of every federal government institution to submit an annual report to Parliament on the administration of the Act during the fiscal year. This report outlines Infrastructure Canada's accomplishments in carrying out its access to information responsibilities and obligations during the 2017-2018 reporting period.

About Infrastructure Canada

Infrastructure Canada is the main department responsible for federal efforts to enhance Canada's public infrastructure. This is accomplished through implementing the Government of Canada's infrastructure plan that enables strategic investments in core public infrastructure to create long-term growth; improves the resilience of communities and transition to a clean growth economy; and improves social inclusion and socio-economic outcomes of Canadians. This work is done in partnership with provinces, territories, municipalities, Indigenous communities, other federal departments and agencies, private sector and not-for-profit organizations. Established in 2002, Infrastructure Canada helps to ensure that Canadians benefit from world-class public infrastructure from coast to coast to coast.

The Office of Infrastructure Canada is part of the Infrastructure and Communities portfolio.

The portfolio includes the following:

  • The Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated (JCCBI), a Crown Corporation whose mandate is to ensure users' safe passage on its structures located in the Greater Montréal Area by their proper management, maintenance and repair, while respecting the environment and optimizing traffic flow.
  • The Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority (WDBA), a Crown Corporation with the responsibility to design, finance, build, operate and maintain the new, publicly-owned Gordie Howe International Bridge between Windsor, Ontario and Detroit, Michigan that will be delivered through a public-private partnership. Responsibility for the WDBA was transferred from the Minister of Transport to the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities on November 4, 2015.
  • The Minister of Intrastructure and Communities was designated as the Minister responsible for federal matters relating to the Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative effective November 4, 2015. In 2000, the Government of Canada, the Province of Ontario and the City of Toronto each announced a commitment of $500 million to fund the Initiative. The Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Corporation, which is a not-for-profit corporation publicly known as Waterfront Toronto, was established in 2001.
  • PPP Canada Inc. is a federal parent Crown Corporation named in Part 1 of Schedule III of the Financial Administration Act and was incorporated pursuant to the Canada Business Corporations Act. The Minister of Infrastructure and Communities was designated the responsible Minister of PPP Canada on July 8, 2016. In 2017-2018, the department began work related to the wind-down of PPP Canada and it was dissolved on March 31, 2018.  The outstanding agreements from the P3 Canada Fund were transferred to the department.
  • The Canada Infrastructure Bank (CIB), a Crown Corporation, uses federal support to attract private sector and institutional investment to new revenue-generating infrastructure projects that are in the public interest. The CIB leverages the capital and expertise of the private sector and helps government partners build new infrastructure across Canada. The Canada Infrastructure Bank Act received Royal Assent on June 22, 2017, and the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities was designated the responsible Minister on July 4, 2017.

As the federal lead for the Investing in Canada plan, Infrastructure Canada coordinates with 13 other federal departments as well as organizations to advance the Government of Canada's ambitious $180 billion Plan. In 2017-2018, the department began negotiations with provinces and territories for the Integrated Bilateral Agreements while continuing to administer older infrastructure programs such as the Building Canada Fund, New Building Canada Fund, and Gas Tax Fund. Other federal departments and agencies administering infrastructure funding programs outlined in the Investing in Canada plan are:

  • Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation
  • Canadian Heritage
  • Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada
  • Employment and Social Development Canada
  • Environment and Climate Change Canada
  • Health Canada
  • Indigenous Services Canada
  • Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada
  • Natural Resources Canada
  • Parks Canada
  • Public Health Agency of Canada
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Transport Canada

Infrastructure Canada's raison d'être is summarized as: “The key to building Canada for the 21st century is a strategic and collaborative long-term infrastructure plan that builds economically vibrant, strategically planned, sustainable and inclusive communities. Infrastructure Canada works closely with all orders of government and other partners to enable investments in social, green, public transit and other core public infrastructure, as well as trade and transportation infrastructure.”

ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

Infrastructure Canada is headed by the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, Deputy Minister and Associate Deputy Minister of Infrastructure and Communities, who are supported by the Assistant Deputy Minister of Policy and Results, Assistant Deputy Minister of Program Operations, Assistant Deputy Minister of Corporate Services, Assistant Deputy Minister of Investment, Partnerships and Innovation as well as the Director General of Smart Cities, the Director General of Communications and the Chief Audit and Evaluation Executive.

CHALLENGES AND KEY ISSUES

Most requests received by Infrastructure Canada involve other federal institutions, other levels of government and third parties. Extensions are often required to obtain recommendations regarding the disclosure of third party information. The ability of the department to meet the extended statutory deadlines is often dependent on the ability of the consulted organization to respond within the expected time frame.

Infrastructure Canada expects an increase in the total number of pages to be processed in 2018-2019 due to its high profile role in the following areas:

  • In 2018-2019, the Investing in Canada plan will continue to make historic new investments in infrastructure by providing over $180 billion over 12 years for public transit, green infrastructure, social infrastructure, trade and transportation infrastructure, and rural and northern communities.
  • In 2018-2019, the department continued to support the Canada Infrastructure Bank, a Crown Corporation, now in its portfolio, that will deliver $35 billion in federal support to attract private sector and institutional investment to new infrastructure projects that are in the public interest.
  • In 2018-2019, the department will continue to administer the Smart Cities Challenge, a pan-Canadian competition for communities to bring forward ideas to improve the quality of life through better city planning and implementation of clean, digitally connected technology and advanced digital connections for homes and businesses. The government proposes to provide Infrastructure Canada with $300 million over 11 years to launch a Smart Cities Challenge Fund.
  • In 2018-2019, the department expects an increase in public interest resulting from the Toronto Waterfront Revitalization Initiative. Waterfront Toronto has a 25-year mandate and $30-billion long-term plan to transform 800 hectares of brownfield lands on Toronto's waterfront into beautiful, accessible, sustainable mixed-use communities and dynamic public spaces. It is one of the largest infrastructure projects in North America.
  • In 2018-2019, the department continued to advance construction of the New Champlain Bridge Corridor project, a major infrastructure project of national significance, and support Jacques Cartier and Champlain Bridges Incorporated in its role of keeping the Champlain Bridge safe. Infrastructure Canada works with Public Services and Procurement Canada (as the contract authority) and PPP Canada (as P3 advisors) for the new bridge.
  • In 2018-2019, the department continued to support the Windsor-Detroit Bridge Authority, a Crown Corporation responsible for the delivery of the Gordie Howe International Bridge.

As indicated in Infrastructure Canada's 2017-2018 Departmental Plan, ATIP continues to ensure timely responses to access to information and privacy requests, and provide ongoing ATIP training for employees.

ACCESS TO INFORMATION AND PRIVACY (ATIP)

Responsibility for processing requests received under the Access to Information Act rests with the Deputy Minister, the Associate Deputy Minister, Assistant Deputy Ministers and the ATIP Coordinator for the department (as per Annex “A”). The ATIP Division is part of the Corporate Services Branch.

As of March 30, 2018, the unit is staffed with two teams: 1) Operations; and, 2) Policy, Privacy and Governance. The Operations team is responsible for the administration of the Access to Information Act. It is comprised of one senior analyst and three junior analysts. The Policy, Privacy, and Governance team is responsible for all corporate activities relating to the Access to Information Act. The team is comprised of one team leader and one senior analyst.

ATIP ACTIVITIES

Operations:

  • Processing ATIP requests;
  • Processing consultations received from other institutions;
  • Providing advice and guidance to employees and senior officials on ATIP-related matters;
  • Acting as representative for the department in dealings with the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Information Commissioner, and other government institutions regarding the application of the ATIP legislation.

Policy, Privacy, and Governance:

  • Delivering ATIP training to departmental employees;
  • Producing the Annual Reports to Parliament;
  • Coordinating updates to the Info Source, an annual Government of Canada publication about its organization and information holdings;
  • Developing departmental procedures for processing ATIP requests and establishing policy instruments and updating existing policy for use, collection and disclosure of information pursuant to the Access to Information Act; and
  • Acting as representative for the department in dealings with the Treasury Board Secretariat, the Information Commissioner, and other government institutions regarding the application of the ATIP legislation.

DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY

The Associate Deputy Minister, Assistant Deputy Ministers, Chief Audit and Evaluation Executive, Director General of the Smart Cities Challenge and Director General of Communications have been delegated authority to exercise the duties and functions of the Deputy Minister for all sections of the Act, while the ATIP Coordinator has been delegated administrative duties. See Annex “A” for a copy of the signed and dated full instrument of delegation.

PERFORMANCE AND STATISCAL OVERVIEW

The annual statistical report for fiscal year 2017-2018 is provided in Annex “B”.

Access to Information Requests

In 2017-2018, the department received one hundred and sixty-nine (169) requests made pursuant to the Access to Information Act. When combined with the thirty four (34) requests carried over from 2016-2017, Infrastructure Canada was responsible for processing a total of two hundred and three (203) requests during this reporting period.

During the reporting period, one hundred and forty-five (145) requests were completed by March 30, 2018, and the remaining fifty-eight (58) are carried forward into 2018-2019.

Table 1 - Number of Access to Information Requests

N/A

Number of Requests

Received during reporting period 2017-2018

169

Outstanding from previous reporting period 2016-2017

34

Total

203

Closed during reporting period 2017-2018

145

Carried over to next reporting period 2018-2019

58

Table 2 - Access to Information Requests

N/A

2012-2013

2013–2014

2014–2015

2015-2016

2016-2017

2017-2018

Received during reporting period

59

38

919

128

178

169

Outstanding from previous reporting period

22

25

13

101

68

34

Total

81

63

932

229

246

203

Number of pages processed

One of the most important indicators of workload assessment is the total number of pages processed. For example, in 2016-2017, INFC ATIP received 246 requests. However, the total number of pages processed in 2016-2017 (18,725 pages) was 37% higher than in 2017-2018 when INFC ATIP processed 203 requests. During the reporting period 2017-2018, Infrastructure Canada processed a total of 11,645 pages.

Table 3 - Access to Information Request - Number of pages processed

N/A

2012–2013

2013–2014

2014–2015

2015–2016

2016–2017

2017–2018

Number of pages processed

18,462

15,430

326,696

92,438

18,725

11,645

Requester Sources

Members of the media make up the largest group of requesters, followed by those who decline to identiy, business, organization, academia, and public. The breakdown is as follows:

Table 4 - Requester Sources

Source

Number of Requests

%

Media

142

84

Decline to Identify

11

6.5

Business (private sector)

6

3.5

Organization

6

3.5

Academia

3

2

Public

1

0.5

Total

169

100%


Graph 1: Requester sources

Disposition of Completed Requests

Of the one hundred and forty-five (145) requests completed in 2017-2018, access to records was given, in whole or in part, in response to one hundred and twenty-one (121) requests. The disposition of completed requests is summarized below:

Table 5 - Disposition of Completed Requests

Disposition

Number of Requests

%

All Disclosed

19

13%

Disclosed in Part

102

70%

All exempted

0

0

All excluded

2

2%

No records exist

19

13%

Request abandoned

3

2%

Total

145

100%


Graph 1: Disposition of Completed Requests

Completion Time and Extensions

Infrastructure Canada processed approximately 39% of requests within the first 30 days. Time required to process the requests is summarized below:

Table 6 - Completion Time and Extensions

Completion Time

Number of Requests

%

1 to 15 days

12

8%

16 to 30 days

45

31%

31 to 60 days

29

20%

61 to 120 days

46

32%

121 to 180 days

5

4%

181 to 365 days

2

1%

More than 365 days

6

4%

Total

145

100%


Graph 1: Completion Time and Extensions

Table 7 - Disposition of Completed Requests and Completion Time

N/A

Completion Time

Disposition of Requests

1 to 15 Days

16 to 30 Days

31 to 60 Days

61 to 120 Days

121 to 180 Days

181 to 365 Days

More Than 365 Days

Total

All disclosed

1

11

4

2

0

0

1

19

Disclosed in part

4

21

22

44

5

1

5

102

All exempted

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

All excluded

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

No records exist

6

10

2

0

0

1

0

19

Request transferred

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Request abandoned

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

3

Neither confirmed nor denied

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

12

45

29

46

5

2

6

145

The department found it necessary to extend the timeframe in seventy-eight (78) instances. Eight (8) were extended in order to not unreasonably interfere with the operations of the institution, sixty-five (65) in order to conduct external consultations, five (5) were extended due to third party notifications.

Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations

In 2017-2018, the department received forty-five (45) consultation requests from other government institutions. When combined with the two (2) consultation requests outstanding from 2016-2017, Infrastructure Canada processed forty-seven (47) consultation requests during this reporting period. At the end of the reporting period, two (2) consultation requests from other government organizations will be carried forward to 2018-2019.

In 2017-2018 Infrastructure Canada received five (5) requests from other organizations. At the end of the reporting period, zero (0) consultation requests from other organizations will be carried forward to 2018-2019.

Table 8 - Consultations received from other government institutions and organizations

Consultations

Other Government of Canada Institutions

Number of Pages to Review

Other Organizations

Number of Pages to Review

Received during reporting period

45

1,907

5

36

Outstanding from the previous reporting period

2

44

1

184

Total

47

1,951

6

220

Closed during the reporting period

45

1,951

6

220

Pending at the end of the reporting period

2

0

0

0

TRAINING AND PROCEDURES

During the fiscal year, the ATIP Division offered informal training and briefing sessions to Infrastructure Canada. These sessions reinforced the importance of the Access to Information Act as well as employees' role as public servants to ensure compliance with the legislative requirements. The ongoing training format is delivered in collaboration with Corporate Information Management and focuses on real-life situations in a workshop setting as opposed to delivering lectures on an overview of the Access to Information Act.

In 2017-2018, approximately fifty (50) employees participated in ATIP awareness training. ATIP will continue to deliver ongoing training for Infrastructure Canada employees in the coming fiscal year.

POLICIES

During the fiscal year there were no new or revised institution-specific policies, guidelines and procedures related to access to information that were implemented in the institution.

COMPLAINTS

During the reporting period, there were five (5) registered complaints with the Office of the Information Commissioner of Canada. One file was resolved; there are currently four (4) outstanding.

JUDICAL REVIEW

During the reporting period, there were no applications for judicial review filed with the Federal Court.

TRANSLATION OF RECORDS

No requests for translation were received during fiscal year 2017-2018.

TIME MONITORING

The ATIP Unit informs the Deputy Minister's Office, Associate Deputy Minister, Assistant Deputy Ministers and their representatives electronically on a weekly basis of all outstanding retrievals and other relevant information.

RESOURCES

The costs associated with the administration of the Access to Information Act and human resources, during the reporting period, can be summarized as follows:

Table 9 - Costs associated with the administration of the Access to Information Act

Expenditures

Amount

Salaries

$460,018

Overtime

$442

Goods and Services

$1,765

• Professional services contracts

$0

N/A

• Other (ATIP employee training and supplies, etc.)

$1,765

Total

$462,225

Table 10 - Resources associated with the administration of the the Access to Information Act

Resources

Person Years Dedicated to Access to Information Activities

Full-time employees

5.69

Part-time and casual employees

0.28

Regional staff

0.00

Consultants and agency personnel

0.00

Students

0.48

Total

6.45

MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTABILITY FRAMEWORK

Infrastructure Canada's senior management and its ATIP Coordinator are committed to improving delivery and fulfillment of ATIP obligations. The department is continuing to improve training initiatives, proceeding with the inventory of all personal information banks, registering all personal information banks; and ensuring that all relevant information holdings are described in Infrastructure Canada's Info Source Chapter.

SUMMARY

Building on a history of successful and collaborative projects, Infrastructure Canada is committed to working with partners and stakeholders to improve public infrastructure across Canada, while continuing to lead the Government of Canada's efforts to address the public infrastructure needs of the country.

Infrastructure Canada takes its responsibilities under the Access to Information Act very seriously and will continue to respond to the needs of the requesters as effectively and efficiently as possible.

ANNEXES

Annex A: Delegation Order - Access to Information Act

Annex B: Statistical Report on the Administration of the Access to Information Act at Infrastructure Canada in 2017-2018

Annex A

Delegation Order
Access to Information Act

  1. I, Kelly Gillis, Deputy Head of Infrastructure and Comunities, pursuant to section 73 of the Access to Information Act (the “Act”), designate the persons holding the positions listed in column 1 of the annexed Schedule, or the persons occupying those positions on an acting basis, to exercise the powers, duties or functions of the head of the government institution under the provisions of the Act and related regulations, identified in column 2 of the Schedule.
  2. No authority is granted to any designate to reverse, in any matter, a decision taken in that matter by myself.
  3. All previous designations, whenever made, are hereby cancelled.

Dated at Ottawa, Ontario
This 15 day of November 2017.

Original signed November 15, 2017 by the Deputy Head of Infrastructure and Communities, Kelly Gillis

SCHEDULE

Column 1 - Position

Column 2 - Provision

Associate Deputy Head

All sections

Assistant Deputy Ministers

All sections

Chief Audit and Evaluation Executive

All sections

Director General/Smart Cities Challenge

All sections

Director General of Communications

All sections

ATIP Coordinator

Act : 7(a), 7(b); 8(1); 9; 11; 12(2)(b), 12(3)(b); 27(1), 27(4); 28(1)(b), 28(2), 28(4); 29(1); 33; 43(1); 44(2)

Regulations: 6(1); 7(2), 7(3); 8; 8.1.

ATIP Officers (PM-03), (PM-04), (PM-05)

Act: 7(a); 27(4)

Regulations: 6(1); 7(2), 7(3)

Annex B

Statistical Report on the Administration of the Access to Information Act
at Infrastructure Canada

in 2017-2018

Statiscal Report on the Access to Information Act

Name of institution: Infrastructure Canada

Reporting period: 2017-04-01 to 2018-03-31

Part 1: Requests Under the Access to Inforamtion Act

1.1 Number of requests

Number of Requests

Received during reporting period

169

Outstanding from previous reporting period

34

Total

203

Closed during reporting period

145

Carried over to next reporting period

58

1.2 Sources of requests

Source

Number of Requests

Media

142

Academia

3

Business (private sector)

6

Organization

6

Public

1

Decline to Identify

11

Total

169

1.3 Informal requests

Completion Time

1 to 15 Days

16 to 30 Days

31 to 60 Days

61 to 120 Days

121 to 180 Days

181 to 365 Days

More Than 365 Days

Total

52

0

0

0

0

0

0

52

Note: All requests previously recorded as "treated informally" will now be accounted for in this section only.

Part 2: Requests Closed During the Reporting Period

2.1 Disposition and completion time

Disposition of Requests

Completion Time

1 to 15 Days

16 to 30 Days

31 to 60 Days

61 to 120 Days

121 to 180 Days

181 to 365 Days

More Than 365 Days

Total

All disclosed

1

11

4

2

0

0

1

19

Disclosed in part

4

21

22

44

5

1

5

102

All exempted

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

All excluded

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

No records exist

6

10

2

0

0

1

0

19

Request transferred

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Request abandoned

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

3

Neither confirmed nor denied

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

12

45

29

46

5

2

6

145

2.2 Exemptions

Section

Number of Requests

Section

Number of Requests

Section

Number of Requests

Section

Number of Requests

13(1)(a)

7

16(2)

1

18(a)

9

20.1

0

13(1)(b)

0

16(2)(a)

0

18(b)

21

20.2

0

13(1)(c)

6

16(2)(b)

0

18(c)

0

20.4

0

13(1)(d)

3

16(2)(c)

5

18(d)

6

21(1)(a)

58

13(1)(e)

0

16(3)

0

18.1(1)(a)

0

21(1)(b)

38

14

2

16.1(1)(a)

0

18.1(1)(b)

0

21(1)(c)

37

14(a)

46

16.1(1)(b)

0

18.1(1)(c)

0

21(1)(d)

17

14(b)

13

16.1(1)(c)

0

18.1(1)(d)

0

22

0

15(1)

0

16.1(1)(d)

0

19(1)

36

22.1(1)

0

15(1) - I.A.

10

16.2(1)

0

20(1)(a)

0

23

6

15(1) - Def

0

16.3

0

20(1)(b)

0

24(1)

0

15(1) - S.A.

0

16.4(1)(a)

0

20(1)(b.1)

0

26

1

16(1)(a)(i)

0

16.4(1)(b)

0

20(1)(c)

13

16(1)(a)(ii)

0

16.5

0

20(1)(d)

6

16(1)(a)(iii)

0

17

0

16(1)(b)

0

16(1)(c)

1

16(1)(d)

0

2.3 Exclusions

Section

Number of Requests

Section

Number of Requests

Section

Number of Requests

68(a)

0

69(1)

0

69(1)(g) re (a)

38

68(b)

0

69(1)(a)

4

69(1)(g) re (b)

0

68(c)

0

69(1)(b)

0

69(1)(g) re (c)

21

68.1

0

69(1)(c)

0

69(1)(g) re (d)

11

68.2(a)

0

69(1)(d)

6

69(1)(g) re (e)

18

68.2(b)

0

69(1)(e)

4

69(1)(g) re (f)

3

N/A

69(1)(f)

0

69.1(1)

0

2.4 Format of information released

Disposition

Paper

Electronic

Other Formats

All disclosed

9

10

0

Disclosed in part

53

49

0

Total

62

59

0

2.5 Complexity

2.5.1 Relevant pages processed and disclosed

Disposition of Requests

Number of Pages Processed

Number of Pages Disclosed

Number of Requests

All disclosed

459

459

19

Disclosed in part

11177

8945

102

All exempted

0

0

0

All excluded

9

0

2

Request abandoned

0

0

3

Neither confirmed nor denied

0

0

0

2.5.2 Relevant pages processed and disclosed by size of requests

Disposition

Less Than 100
Pages Processed

101-500
Pages Processed

501-1000
Pages Processed

1001-5000
Pages Processed

More Than 5000
Pages Processed

Number of Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of Requests

Pages Disclosed

All disclosed

18

327

1

132

0

0

0

0

0

0

Disclosed in part

84

1853

13

2023

1

26

4

5043

0

0

All exempted

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

All excluded

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Request abandoned

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Neither confirmed nor denied

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

107

2180

14

2155

1

26

4

5043

0

0

2.5.3 Other complexities

Disposition

Consultation Required

Assessment of Fees

Legal Advice Sought

Other

Total

All disclosed

6

0

0

0

6

Disclosed in part

53

0

42

2

97

All exempted

0

0

0

0

0

All excluded

0

0

1

0

1

Request abandoned

0

0

0

0

0

Neither confirmed nor denied

0

0

0

0

0

Total

59

0

43

2

104

2.6 Deemed refusals

2.6.1 Reasons for not meeting statutory deadline

Number of Requests Closed Past the Statutory Deadline

Principal Reason

Workload

External Consultation

Internal Consultation

Other

34

5

4

7

18

2.6.2 Number of days past deadline

Number of Days Past Deadline

Number of Requests Past Deadline Where No Extension Was Taken

Number of Requests Past Deadline Where An Extension Was Taken

Total

1 to 15 days

11

10

21

16 to 30 days

0

2

2

31 to 60 days

0

6

6

61 to 120 days

0

2

2

121  to 180 days

0

1

1

181 to 365 days

0

0

0

More than 365 days

0

2

2

Total

11

23

34

2.7 Requests for translation

Translation Requests

Accepted

Refused

Total

English to French

0

0

0

French to English

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

Part 3: Extensions

3.1 Reasons for extensions and disposition of requests

Disposition of Requests Where
an Extension Was Taken

9(1)(a)
Interference With Operations

9(1)(b)
Consultation

9(1)(c)
Third-Party Notice

Section 69

Other

All disclosed

1

0

6

0

Disclosed in part

6

22

36

5

All exempted

0

0

0

0

All excluded

0

0

0

0

No records exist

1

0

0

0

Request abandoned

0

1

0

0

Total

8

23

42

5

3.2 Length of extensions

Length of Extensions

9(1)(a)
Interference With Operations

9(1)(b)
Consultation

9(1)(c)
Third-Party Notice

Section 69

Other

30 days or less

3

6

10

1

31 to 60 days

0

15

31

4

61 to 120 days

0

2

1

0

121 to 180 days

0

0

0

0

181 to 365 days

0

0

0

0

365 days or more

5

0

0

0

Total

8

23

42

5

Part 4: Fees

Fee Type

Fee Collected

Fee Waived or Refunded

Number of
Requests

Amount

Number of
Requests

Amount

Application

125

$625

15

$75

Search

0

$0

0

$0

Production

0

$0

0

$0

Programming

0

$0

0

$0

Preparation

0

$0

0

$0

Alternative format

0

$0

0

$0

Reproduction

0

$0

0

$0

Total

125

$625

15

$75

Part 5: Consultations Received From Other Institutions and Organizations

5.1 Consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions and organizations

Consultations

Other Government of Canada Institutions

Number of Pages to Review

Other Organizations

Number of Pages to Review

Received during reporting period

45

1907

5

36

Outstanding from the previous reporting period

2

44

1

184

Total

47

1951

6

220

Closed during the reporting period

45

1951

6

220

Pending at the end of the reporting period

2

0

0

0

5.2 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other Government of Canada institutions

Recommendation

Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests

1 to 15 Days

16 to 30 Days

31 to 60 Days

61 to 120 Days

121  to 180 Days

181 to 365 Days

More Than 365 Days

Total

Disclose entirely

11

7

0

0

0

0

0

18

Disclose in part

6

9

7

0

1

0

0

23

Exempt entirely

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exclude entirely

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Consult other institution

2

1

1

0

0

0

0

4

Other

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

19

17

8

0

1

0

0

45

5.3 Recommendations and completion time for consultations received from other organizations

Recommendation

Number of Days Required to Complete Consultation Requests

1 to 15 Days

16 to 30 Days

31 to 60 Days

61 to 120 Days

121  to 180 Days

181 to 365 Days

More Than 365 Days

Total

Disclose entirely

5

1

0

0

0

0

0

6

Disclose in part

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exempt entirely

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Exclude entirely

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Consult other institution

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Other

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

5

1

0

0

0

0

0

6

Part 6: Completion Time of Consultations on Cabinet Confidences

6.1 Requests with Legal Services

Number of Days

Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed

101-500 Pages Processed

501-1000
Pages Processed

1001-5000
Pages Processed

More Than 5000
Pages Processed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

1 to 15

21

412

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

16 to 30

16

325

1

44

0

0

0

0

0

0

31 to 60

4

103

3

302

0

0

0

0

0

0

61 to 120

1

12

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

121 to 180

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

181 to 365

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

More than 365

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

42

852

4

346

0

0

0

0

0

0

6.2 Requests with Privy Council Office

Number of Days

Fewer Than 100 Pages Processed

101‒500 Pages Processed

501-1000
Pages Processed

1001-5000
Pages Processed

More Than 5000
Pages Processed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

Number of
Requests

Pages Disclosed

1 to 15

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

16 to 30

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

31 to 60

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

61 to 120

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

121 to 180

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

181 to 365

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

More than 365

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Part 7: Complaints and Investigations

Section 32

Section 35

Section 37

Total

2

2

1

5

Part 8: Court Action

Section 41

Section 42

Section 44

Total

0

0

0

0

Part 9: Resources Related to the Access to Information Act

9.1 Costs

Expenditures

Amount

Salaries

$460,018

Overtime

$442

Goods and Services

$1,765

• Professional services contracts

$0

 

• Other

$1,765

Total

$462,225

9.2 Human Resources

Resources

Person Years Dedicated to Access to Information Activities

Full-time employees

5.69

Part-time and casual employees

0.28

Regional staff

0.00

Consultants and agency personnel

0.00

Students

0.48

Total

6.45

Note: Enter values to two decimal places.

Enquiries regarding this document may be directed to the Access to Information and Privacy Office, at the following coordinates:

Access to Information and Privacy Office
Infrastructure Canada

180 Kent Street, 11th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario K1P 0B6

Telephone: 613-948-1531
Facsimile: 613-948-9393

Date modified: