2016-17 Departmental Results Report


Details on Transfer Payment Programs of $5 Million or More

Infrastructure Canada manages the following Transfer Payment ProgramsFootnote 1

Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund (CSIF):

Name of transfer payment program

Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund. (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2003-2004

End date

2019-2020Footnote 2

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2011-2012Footnote 3

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.4: Large-Scale Infrastructure Investments

Description

This program supports projects that sustain economic growth and enhance the quality of life of Canadians. Investments are made in cooperation with the provinces, territories, municipalities, and the private sector, and contribute to the construction, renewal and/or enhancement of public infrastructure. The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund leverages additional contributions from other partners by providing up to 50 percent funding for eligible projects.Footnote 4

Results achieved

Since the program began in 2003-04, a total of 91 projects with a federal contribution of $4.6 billion and total value of $12.4 billion have been approved under the program. Collaboration with federal delivery partners and stakeholders is effectively supporting program delivery. Over 80 percent of projects are completed.

The largest categories of investment under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund are the following: Highways and Roads infrastructure, with a total federal investment of over $1.7 billion, and Public Transit infrastructure, with a total federal investment of close to $1.5 billion.

In 2016-17, the Department continued to monitor and deliver the program with provincial and territorial partners and Transport Canada.

Infrastructure Canada has largely met its targets under the program and intends to continue the monitoring and due diligence of ongoing projects to ensure their completion as part of the closeout activities of the program.

Comments on variances

Actual Spending in 2016-17 was lower than originally projected, given that CSIF projects are large-scale and complex in nature, many unknowns may arise during the course of the fiscal year. These factors include project delays resulting from inclement weather and from technical and other construction-related complexities that also cause construction delays, which explain deviations of actual expenditures from the original forecast.

It is also important to note that actual disbursement of federal contributions lag behind the actual construction of projects as recipients are reimbursed for expenditures only once they submit claims.

The CSIF program was extended in 2011-12, to allow recipients that have encountered construction delays to access the remainder of their federal contribution in order to complete their projects as expected.

Audits completed or planned

An internal audit of the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund program was completed in March 2013.

Evaluations completed or planned

A joint evaluation of the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund and the Border Infrastructure Fund was completed in July 2014.

An evaluation to assess the impact of the department's programs on the largest cities in Canada, including CSIF, is scheduled for completion in 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

All funding available for projects under this program has been committed. The Department continues to work with recipients to flow funding, including final payments and ensure that projects are closed.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2016
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

233,373,467

141,733,441

87,156,234

87,156,234

54,045,215

(33,111,019)

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

233,373,467

141,733,441

87,156,234

87,156,234

54,045,215

(33,111,019)

Border Infrastructure Fund (BIF):

Name of transfer payment program

Border Infrastructure Fund. (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2003-2004

End date

2019-2020Footnote 5

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2011-2012Footnote 6

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Description

This program provides funding for investments in physical infrastructure, transportation system infrastructure and improved analytical capacity at the largest surface border crossings between Canada and the United States, as well as several other crossing points in Canada. Announced in Budget 2001, the fund provides up to 50 percent federal funding to support eligible projects at Canada's border crossings. Transport Canada is the federal delivery partner for this program.

Results achieved

Since the program began in 2003-04, a total of 12 projects with a federal contribution of $591 million and total value of $1.35 billion have been approved under the program. 2 projects with a federal contribution of $208 Million and total value of $423 million are still underway.

In 2016-17, the Department continued to monitor and deliver the program with Transport Canada for the Border Infrastructure Fund.

Infrastructure Canada has largely met its targets to contribute to quality, cost-effective public infrastructure in support of a competitive economy through investments in physical and intelligent transportation system infrastructure to reduce border bottlenecks and expand or improve border/system capacity. Infrastructure Canada intends to continue to work with Transport Canada in the monitoring and due diligence of ongoing projects to ensure their completion as part of the closeout activities of the program.

Comments on variances

Transportation projects funded under the BIF are large and complex by nature which makes them at higher risk of experiencing unexpected delays during their implementation as was the case in previous years. Projects faced delays for various reasons including technical and other construction-related complexities. Those factors lead to delays in the disbursement of federal contributions since recipients are reimbursed after they have incurred their expenditures and submitted their claims.

Audits completed or planned

No Internal Audit has been conducted of this program.

Evaluations completed or planned

A joint evaluation of the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund and the Border Infrastructure Fund was completed in July 2014.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

All funding available for projects under this program has been committed. The Department continues to work with recipients to flow funding, including final payments and ensure that projects are closed.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

20,863,226

17,699,761

1,885,793

0

0

(1,885,793)

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

20,863,226

17,699,761

1,885,793

0Footnote 7

0

(1,885,793)

Gas Tax Fund (GTF):

Name of transfer payment program

Gas Tax Fund. (Payments under this program are statutory).

Start date

2005-2006

End date

OngoingFootnote 8

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-2014Footnote 9

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.2: Permanent and Flexible Infrastructure Funding

Description

This program provides municipalities with predictable long-term funding, enabling construction and rehabilitation of core public infrastructure. The federal government concluded Gas Tax Fund Agreements with provinces, territories, the Association of Municipalities of Ontario, the Union of British Columbia Municipalities and the City of Toronto, which were in effect from 2005-06 to 2013-14. Moreover, all Gas Tax Fund Agreements have been renewed and signed for the permanent Gas Tax Fund, starting in 2014-15. Gas Tax Fund Agreements and funding letters establish an accountability framework allowing the Government of Canada to flow Gas Tax Fund money twice a year to signatories which, in turn, flow funds to municipalities based on an agreed-upon allocation formula. For their part, municipalities decide which projects to prioritize within established investment categories. In addition to supporting environmental objectives, the permanent Gas Tax Fund supports increased productivity and economic growth and strong cities and communities via an expanded list of eligible investment categories. Municipalities can pool, bank and borrow against this funding, providing significant additional financial flexibility. Eligible recipients are required to report annually on their use of funds and their compliance to terms and conditions of the Gas Tax Fund Agreements.

The renewed Gas Tax Fund is now indexed at 2 percent per year which will provide municipalities with additional funding over the long term. It also provides municipalities with greater flexibility to spend federal funding as a result of expanded investment categories.

Results achieved

During 2016-17, about $2.1 billion flowed to municipalities across the country through the Gas Tax Fund. This amount includes a transfer of about $30 million from older federal infrastructure programs in accordance with Budget 2016. The most commonly funded project category was local roads, followed by drinking water and wastewater projects.Footnote 10

In response to the 2016 Spring Report for the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, Infrastructure Canada provides Gas Tax Fund signatories with updated reporting guidelines for reporting on results, and successfully hosted an intergovernmental Gas Tax Fund workshop focused on reporting on outcomes and asset management best practices. The first outcomes report is expected in 2016.

Comments on variances

The Gas Tax Fund is a source of predictable federal funding for municipalities and as such, Infrastructure Canada and its partners work together to ensure that payments are made on schedule. Funding letters issued to signatories are dependent on the submission and acceptance of an Annual Report (Financial Report Table, Project List) and an Independent Audit Opinion or Audit Based Attestation. In the absence of duly completed reports, Infrastructure Canada can withhold funding letters from recipients until such time that completed reports are accepted. In 2016-17, all jurisdictions received their payments, totalling about $2.07 billion. In addition, they received a total of about $30 million in additional funding that was transferred from uncommitted funds from older federal infrastructure programs in accordance with Budget 2016.

Audits completed or planned

No Internal Audit has been conducted of this program.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the Gas Tax Fund was completed in August 2015.

GTF will be considered as part of evaluations of the impacts of infrastructure funding in small communities and for largest cities in Canada (both planned for completion in FY 2019-20).

The next GTF evaluation is also scheduled for completion in FY 2020-21.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

INFC held a Gas Tax Fund (GTF) Workshop in early 2017 with provincial, territorial and municipal counterparts to support the program's objectives of strengthening ongoing collaborations with partners through information sharing and discussions on various components of the agreements.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total other types of transfer payments

1,973,269,432

1,973,269,432

2,071,932,904

2,102,088,261

2,102,088,261

30,155,357

Total program

1,973,269,432

1,973,269,432

2,071,932,904

2,102,088,261

2,102,088,261Footnote 11

30,155,357

Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund (PT Base Fund):

Name of transfer payment program

Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund. (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2007-2008

End date

2018-2019Footnote 12

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-2014Footnote 13

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.1: Funding for Provincial-Territorial Priorities

Description

This program provides base funding to each province and territory for core infrastructure priorities. In addition, funding under the Building Canada Fund for the three territories is managed under this fund. The Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund was designed to help restore fiscal balance while enhancing Canada's public infrastructure system. It also supports economic growth and productivity, and promotes a cleaner environment and prosperous communities. While payments are made to provinces and territories, ultimate recipients can also include local and regional governments or private sector bodies. In order for federal funding to flow, provinces and territories submit a list of infrastructure initiatives through a capital plan which must be accepted by the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities. Payments are made in advance and cost-sharing provisions apply to a capital plan as a whole, and not individual initiatives. Provinces and territories may pool, bank, or cash-manage these funds to give them flexibility in implementation.

Results achieved

Following the acceleration of the Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund, all funds available under the Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund ($2.3 billion) had been committed as of March 31, 2014.

Under the Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund program parameters, the overall federal contribution to a provincial capital plan, which lists proposed eligible projects, can be up to a maximum of 50% of the capital plan's total eligible costs. In the territories, the federal contribution to a capital plan can be a maximum of 75%. Actual results show that provinces and territories have contributed well beyond the program's cost sharing requirements.

Infrastructure Canada continues to work with provincial and territorial governments to ensure that the required annual expenditure and audit reports are submitted, and the Department provides guidance on any issues that may arise during the provincial or territorial audit that would potentially delay their report submissions and related payments. By March 31, 2017, five of thirteen jurisdictions have completed all reporting obligations and have received their final payments under the Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund, and the program is fully closed for three of these jurisdictions. The funding agreements for the remaining jurisdictions have been extended to allow for the completion of all initiatives and reporting requirements, as well as the reconciliation of cost sharing requirements against final initiative costs. These extended funding agreements are expected to close out over the next two years.

Comments on variances

Under the Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund, the Government of Canada's flow of funding to the provinces and territories is subject to the submission and federal acceptance of Capital Plans and/or Expenditure Reports. As reporting is cumulative, any delay in the submission of a given report will result in delays to subsequent reports, and related payments. In addition, the final expenditure and audit report must demonstrate that all Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund initiatives in a jurisdiction have been completed. Due to delays in completing a small number of initiatives, this requirement was not met by the end of 2016-17 in several provinces and territories, thus delaying the submission of final expenditure and audit reporting and resulting in extensions to funding agreements and the re-profiling of funds for these remaining jurisdictions. As noted above, only five jurisdictions have completed all reporting obligations and received final payments, but two of these are completing capital plan amendment requests to ensure that federal cost sharing is reconciled with final initiative costs before they fully close the program.

Audits completed or planned

An internal audit of the PT Base Fund was completed in June 2011.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the PT Base Fund was completed in 2012-13.

PT Base Fund will be considered as part of evaluations of the impacts of infrastructure funding in small communities and for largest cities in Canada (both planned for completion in FY 2019-20).

Engagement of applicants and recipients

The Department continues to work with jurisdictions to flow funding, including final payments, under the PT-Base Fund.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total other types of transfer payments

25,000,000

50,000,000

97,231,800

97,231,800

3,050,000

(94,181,800)

Total program

25,000,000

50,000,000

97,231,800

97,231,800

3,050,000Footnote 14

(94,181,800)

Building Canada Fund-Communities Component (BCF-CC):

Name of transfer payment program

Building Canada Fund-Communities Component. (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2008-2009

End date

2019-2020Footnote 15

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-2014Footnote 16

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.5: Infrastructure Investments in Small Communities and Rural Areas

Description

This program supports infrastructure needs of smaller communities with populations of less than 100,000. Projects costs are shared with provincial, territorial and municipal governments, with each order of government generally contributing one-third of the eligible costs. The fund supports the construction, renewal, and enhancement of basic infrastructure such as potable water, wastewater treatment, local roads, and other infrastructure needs of small communities.Footnote 17

Results achieved

In most jurisdictions, the BCF-CC project approval deadline was March 31, 2014 and the construction completion deadline March 31, 2016. The deadline continues until 2020 for the Province of Quebec.

In 2016-17, Infrastructure Canada and its federal delivery partners made progress as follows:

  • 42 projects with a federal contribution of $47 million and a total value of $150 million were completed; and
  • 24 projects with a federal contribution of $51 million and a total value of $146 million are still underway.

Since the program began in 2008-09, a total of 954 projects with a federal contribution of $1.01 billion and total value of $3.14 billion have been approved under the program. By March 31, 2017, 902 projects were completed which represents about 95 percent of approved projects.

The largest categories of investment under the program are the following: Wastewater infrastructure with a total federal investment of over $344 million, and Drinking Water infrastructure, with a total federal investment of close to $263 million.

The Department continues to work with its Federal Delivery Partners and provincial partners to monitor the status and eventual close of all outstanding projects. In order to support a timely and efficient program closure process, increased focus has been placed on monitoring the status of ongoing BCF-CC projects.

Comments on variances

Service level agreements with Federal Delivery Partners ended on March 31, 2016. As such, there was increased focus on completing projects and other program closure procedures, including reconciling financial records.

Audits completed or planned

No Internal Audit has been conducted of this program.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component was completed in August 2015.

An evaluation of the impact of infrastructure funding in small communities, which will include BCF-CC, is planned for completion in FY 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

INFC is working with partners and stakeholders to ensure timely completion of projects under the BCF-CC.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

76,338,704

69,630,098

72,213,242

51,663,552

42,626,711

(29,586,531)

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

76,338,704

69,630,098

72,213,242Footnote 18

51,663,552

42,626,711

(29,586,531)

Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component (BCF-MIC):

Name of transfer payment program

Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component. (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2008-2009

End date

2022-2023Footnote 19

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-2014Footnote 20

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.4: Large-Scale Infrastructure Investments

Description

This program targets larger infrastructure projects of national or regional significance. It increases overall investment in public infrastructure and contributes to broad federal objectives: economic growth, a cleaner environment and strong and prosperous communities. At least two-thirds of the funding is targeted to national priorities: water, wastewater, public transit, the core national highway system, and green energy. The Major Infrastructure Component has 12 eligible categories of investment, and priority projects are identified through discussions with provinces. By providing federal funding on a cost-shared basis, it leverages additional contributions from other partners to increase overall investment in infrastructure. Projects must be supported by a business case and undergo a federal review against key program criteria.Footnote 21

Results achieved

In 2016-17, Infrastructure Canada and its federal delivery partners made progress in the implementation of the Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component.

A total of 197 projects with a federal contribution of $6.6 billion and total value of $19.7 billion have been approved under the program. By March 31, 2017, 138 projects were completed. For example, during the reporting period, the Royal Alberta Museum, which received $112,500,000 in federal contributions, held a construction completion event. The museum scheduled to open in March 2018.

The largest categories of investment under the program are the following: Public Transit infrastructure, with a total federal investment of nearly $2.95 billion, and Highways and Roads infrastructure, with a total federal investment of nearly $1.92 Billion.

Program delivery policies and tools have been implemented to improve monitoring and reporting on the progress of the BCF-MIC. Monitoring of expenditures and forecasts has improved forecasting of expenditures under the program, which poses challenges due to the large scope of project investments and uncertainties around construction conditions.

Comments on variances

This program provides significant funding for large, complex projects. It is typical for these projects to require a significant amount of upfront planning, design and procurement. These processes may occur, in whole or in part, after funding commitments are announced. As a result, there is often a period of time that will pass between project announcements and the start of construction. Even when construction has started, a number of factors beyond the control of funding recipients can result in lower spending than forecasted, which in turn cause claims to lag and be submitted for reduced amounts. It is also important to note that actual spending lags behind the actual rate of construction of projects since recipients are reimbursed only once claims are submitted, even though eligible costs may have already been incurred.

Audits completed or planned

No audit has been conducted of this program.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation to assess the impact of the department's programs on the largest cities in Canada, including BCF-MIC, is scheduled for completion in FY 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Although most funding has been committed, Infrastructure Canada worked with provinces to identify priorities for remaining funding. The Department also continued to work with recipients to flow funding, including final payments, and ensure that projects are closed.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

538,025,504

701,208,530

603,887,496

576,117,573

520,695,123

(83,192,373)

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

538,025,504

701,208,530

603,887,496Footnote 22

576,117,573

520,695,123

(83,192,373)

Green Infrastructure Fund (GIF):

Name of transfer payment program

Green Infrastructure Fund. (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2009-2010

End date

2022-2023Footnote 23

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-2014Footnote 24

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Description

This program supports environmental infrastructure projects that promote cleaner air, reduced greenhouse gas emissions and cleaner water. Targeted investments in green infrastructure can contribute to improving the quality of the environment and a more sustainable economy over the longer term. There are five eligible categories of investment: wastewater infrastructure, green energy generation infrastructure, green energy transmission infrastructure, solid waste infrastructure, and carbon transmission and storage infrastructure. By providing up to 50 percent federal funding on a cost-shared basis, the fund leverages additional investments from other partners.Footnote 25

Results achieved

In 2016-17, Infrastructure Canada made progress in the implementation of the Green Infrastructure Fund:

  • 3 additional projects with a federal contribution of $96 million began construction; and
  • 10 projects with a federal contribution of $269  million and a total value of $737 million are still underway.

Since the program began in 2008-09, a total of 21 projects with a federal contribution of $744 million and total value of $2.39 billion have been approved under the program. 5 projects have already been completed.

The largest categories of investment under the program are the following: Wastewater infrastructure, with a total federal investment of $295 million, and Green Energy infrastructure, with a total federal investment of $270 million.

The implementation of the Green Infrastructure Fund has been slower than other programs. This is attributable to the nature of projects funded under this program which are innovative and often rely on newly developed technologies. Infrastructure Canada has met its targets under the program and will continue to oversee the implementation of project-specific agreements of the Green Infrastructure Fund, ensuring that the terms of agreements are respected and that claims for payment are processed efficiently.

Comments on variances

This program provides significant funding for large, complex projects. It is typical for these projects to require a significant amount of planning, design and procurement. These processes may occur, in whole or in part, after funding commitments are announced. Once contribution agreements for projects are signed with project proponents, the Government of Canada has a legal obligation to provide the committed funding in accordance with the terms of those agreements.

Actual spending in 2016-17 was higher than planned due to the advancements in certain projects. For example, payments were made for an energy-related project that was not originally forecasted for this fiscal year.

Audits completed or planned

No Internal Audit has been conducted of this program.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the Green Infrastructure Fund was completed in June 2016.

An evaluation of the impacts of infrastructure funding in small communities, which will include Green Infrastructure Fund, is planned for completion in 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Although most funding has been committed, Infrastructure Canada worked with provinces to identify priorities for remaining funding. The Department also continued to work with recipients to flow funding, including final payments, and ensure that projects are closed.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

36,863,072

11,378,170

19,311,935

85,738,101

44,958,101

25,646,166

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

36,863,072

11,378,170

19,311,935

85,738,101Footnote 26

44,958,101

25,646,166

Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway Fund:

Name of transfer payment program

Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway Program. (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2013-2014

End date

2017-2018Footnote 27

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2013-2014Footnote 28

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Description

The objective of the Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway Program is to construct a 137 kilometre all-season road between Inuvik and Tuktoyaktuk. This includes upgrading a 19 kilometre access road to highway standards, as well as new embankment construction and related structures with final surface topping and additional work to return the land to its original state.

Results achieved

The highway is on track to open to the public in November 2017. To date there is 120km of completed embankment along with 8 bridges and 340 culverts.

This work was completed with 74% of the workforce from the Inuvik region or other Northwest Territories communities. The project has provided 185 people with training or experience in a variety of areas, such as heavy equipment operation.

Comments on variances

Given positive work performance and project progress, adjustments were made to the terms and conditions for the Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway Program, which enabled Infrastructure Canada to pay a significant amount more than what was originally planned for 2016-17.

Audits completed or planned

An internal audit of the Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway Control Framework was completed in January 2015.

A combined audit and evaluation of the impacts of infrastructure in the North, which will include the Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway Program, is planned for completion in FY 2018-19.

Evaluations completed or planned

A combined audit and evaluation of the impacts of infrastructure in the North, which will include the Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway Program, is planned for completion in FY 2018-19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

INFC is working with partners and stakeholders to ensure timely completion of the Tuktoyaktuk Highway project.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

79,275,000

51,375,000

14,250,000

57,000,000Footnote 29

57,000,000

42,750,000

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

79,275,000

51,375,000

14,250,000

57,000,000

57,000,000

42,750,000

New Building Canada Fund-Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component-National and Regional Projects (PTIC-NRP):

Name of transfer payment program

New Building Canada Fund-Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component-National and Regional Projects (PTIC-NRP). (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2014-2015

End date

2023-2024

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-2017Footnote 30

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.4: Large-Scale Infrastructure Investments

Description

This program provides funding to support infrastructure projects of national and regional significance that contribute to economic growth, a clean environment and stronger communities. The PTIC-NRP is an allocation-based program that recognizes and supports the important role that provinces, territories, and municipalities play in helping to build Canada's public infrastructure.

Results achieved

In 2016-17, Infrastructure Canada and its partners made progress in the implementation of the Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component-National and Regional Projects:

  • 100 additional projects with a federal contribution of $3.5 billion and a total value of $7.8 billion were approved.

Since the program began in 2014-15, a total of 143 projects with a federal contribution of $4.4 billion. 6 projects have already been completed.

The largest categories of investment under the program are the following: Public Transit infrastructure, with a total federal investment of nearly $2.1 billion, and Highways and Roads infrastructure, with a total federal investment of nearly $1.4 billion.

Comments on variances

This program provides significant funding for large, complex projects. It is typical for these projects to require a significant amount of upfront planning, design and procurement. These processes may occur, in whole or in part, after funding commitments are announced. As a result, there is often a period of time that will pass between project announcements and the start of construction. Even when construction has started, a number of factors beyond the control of funding recipients can result in lower spending than forecasted. These factors include project delays resulting from inclement weather and from technical and other construction- related complexities that also cause construction delays, which in turn cause claims to lag and be submitted for reduced amounts. It is also important to note that actual spending lags behind the actual rate of construction of projects since recipients are reimbursed only once claims are submitted, even though eligible costs may have already been incurred.

In addition, the 2016-17 Total Authorities Available for Use under this program increased as additional funding was obtained through 2016-17 Supplementary Estimates for two projects.

Audits completed or planned

An internal audit of the New Building Canada Fund – Management Control Framework was completed in October 2015.

An Internal Audit of the New Building Canada Fund is scheduled for completion in FY 2018-19.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the New Building Canada Fund, including PTIC-NRP, is planned for completion in FY 2017-2018.

A combined audit and evaluation of the impacts of infrastructure in the North, which will include PTIC-NRP, is planned for completion in FY 2018-19.

An evaluation to assess the impact of the department's programs on the largest cities in Canada, including PTIC-NRP, is scheduled for completion in FY 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Provinces and Territories are responsible for identifying and bringing forward their project priorities for federal consideration. INFC's website encourages eligible recipients interested in seeking funds under the PTIC-NRP to contact their provincial or territorial ministry responsible for infrastructure in order to determine the process for submitting project proposals. INFC engages with applicants and recipients on a regular basis as part of the implementation of the program.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

11,066,545

41,528,898

5,983,297

422,481,554

119,970,867

113,987,570

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

11,066,545

41,528,898

5,983,297

422,481,554Footnote 31

119,970,867

113,987,570

New Building Canada Fund-Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component-Small Communities Fund (PTIC-SCF):

Name of transfer payment program

New Building Canada Fund-Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component-Small Communities Fund (PTIC-SCF). (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2014-2015

End date

2023-2024

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-2017Footnote 32

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.5: Infrastructure Investments in Smaller Communities and Rural Areas

Description

The PTIC-SCF represents 10 percent (10%) of the overall Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component funding envelope, and makes $964,240,000 in contribution funding available to provinces and territories for local infrastructure. This Sub-Program provides contribution funding for infrastructure projects in small communities with populations of 100,000 or less. Infrastructure Canada enters into funding agreements with provinces and territories for the implementation of the PTIC-SCF. In turn, the provinces and territories administer the project identification process in keeping with SCF program parameters. The PTIC-SCF is designed to leverage the resources and existing processes of provinces and territories in managing local projects, while ensuring federal accountability and oversight for the funding envelope.

Results achieved

In 2016-17, Infrastructure Canada and its partners made progress in the implementation of the Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component-Small Communities Fund:

  • 69 projects with a federal contribution of $31.6 million and a total value of $85 million were completed;
  • 193 additional projects with a federal contribution of $219 million and a total value of $631 million began construction; and
  • 194 projects with a federal contribution of $289 million and a total value of $891 million are still underway.

Since the program began in 2014-15, a total of 562 projects with a federal contribution of $1.06 billion and total value of $2.8 billion have been approved under the program. A total of 77 projects have already been completed which represents 14 percent of approved projects.

The largest categories of investment under the program are the following: Wastewater infrastructure, with a total federal investment of nearly $215 million, and Highways and Roads infrastructure, with a total federal investment of over $195 million.

Comments on variances

Provinces and territories were informed that they must prioritize their PTIC-SCF funding for eligible projects by March 31, 2018 and that all funds which are not formally prioritized by that date will be transferred to the Gas Tax Fund for use in the respective province or territory.

Furthermore, a total of $591,755,302 was transferred into the PTIC-SCF from the PTIC-NRP, thereby increasing the total federal share committed for this program.

Audits completed or planned

An internal audit of the New Building Canada Fund – Management Control Framework was completed in October 2015.

An Internal Audit of the New Building Canada Fund is scheduled for completion in FY 2018-19.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the New Building Canada Fund, including PTIC-SCF, is planned for completion in FY 2017-18.

A combined audit and evaluation of the impacts of infrastructure in the North, which will include PTIC-SCF, is planned for completion in FY 2018-19.

An evaluation of the impacts of infrastructure funding in small communities, which will include PTIC-SCF, is planned for completion in FY 2019-20.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

INFC continues to collaborate with Provinces and Territories to ensure timely project approval.

The provincial and territorial governments have been accepting project proposals through consultation and engagement with municipalities to identify priorities.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

0Footnote 33

12,093,038

152,943,606

113,768,736

113,768,736

(39,174,870)

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

0Footnote 33b

12,093,038

152,943,606

113,768,736

113,768,736

(39,174,870)

New Building Canada Fund-National Infrastructure Component (NBCF-NIC):

Name of transfer payment program

New Building Canada Fund-National Infrastructure Component (NBCF-NIC). (Payments under this program are voted).

Start date

2014-2015

End date

2023-2024

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-2017Footnote 34

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Description

This program supports projects of national significance, that have broad public benefits, and that contribute to Canada's long-term economic growth and prosperity. The NBCF-NIC is a merit-based application-driven program, and as such there are no pre-determined provincial or territorial allocations.

Results achieved

In 2016-2017, Infrastructure Canada and its partners made progress as follows:

  • 6 projects with a federal contribution of $1.34 billion and a total almost of $3.75 billion were approved.

In general, the largest categories of investment under the program are the following: Highways and Roads infrastructure, with a total federal investment of just over $1.3 billion, and Marine infrastructure, with a total federal investment of nearly $112 million.

Comments on variances

This program provides funding for large, complex projects. It is typical for these projects to require a significant amount of upfront planning, and design. These processes may occur, in whole or in part, after funding commitments are announced. As a result, there is often a period of time that will pass between project announcements and the start of construction.

Actual spending in 2016-17 was greater than planned due to advancements in two projects.

Audits completed or planned

An internal audit of the New Building Canada Fund – Management Control Framework was completed in October 2015.

An Internal Audit of the New Building Canada Fund is scheduled for completion in FY 2018-19.

Evaluations completed or planned

An evaluation of the New Building Canada Fund, including NBCF-NIC, is planned for completion in FY 2017-18.

NBCF-NIC will also be considered as part of the combined audit and evaluation of the impacts of infrastructure in the North scheduled for completion in FY 2018-19.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Infrastructure Canada is no longer accepting applications under the NBCF-NIC.

The Government is currently engaging provinces, territories, municipal and Indigenous leaders, as well as global institutional investors and other stakeholders to identify the right mix of infrastructure funding programs to meet Canadians' needs and to position Canada's economy for the future.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total contributions

0

3,069,122

11,146,667

135,900,000

15,379,869

4,233,202

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

0Footnote 35

3,069,122

11,146,667

135,900,000Footnote 36

15,379,869

4,233,202

Public Transit Infrastructure Fund (PTIF):

Name of transfer payment program

Public Transit Infrastructure Fund.

Start date

2016-2017

End date

2019-2020

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-2017Footnote 37

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Description

This program provides short-term funding of $3.4 billion to shorten commute times, cut air pollution, strengthen communities and grow Canada's economy. Infrastructure Canada enters into contribution agreements with all provinces and territories for the delivery of PTIF. In turn, provinces and territories enter into agreements with eligible ultimate recipients to manage projects. As this is a cost-share program, federal funding from all sources can be up to 50% in provinces and 75% in territories of total eligible costs per project. All eligible projects are approved for PTIF funding by Infrastructure Canada and provinces and territories are required to report on progress at least on a semi-annual basis. The PTIF is designed to leverage funding through project partners to accelerate investments in public transit, while ensuring federal accountability and oversight for the funding envelope.

Results achieved

All funding agreements with provinces and territories under PTIF have been signed by the applicable provinces and territories.

During 2016-17, a total of 738 projects with a federal contribution of $1.57 billion and total value of $3.16 billion have been approved under the program, accounting for 46% of overall program funding.

By March 31, 2017, construction had begun on 86 projects with a federal contribution of $447 million and a total value of $894 million.

Comments on variances

Funding agreements with Provinces and Territories were signed between June and September 2016. An agreement was not signed with Nunavut as it does not have a public transit system. Moreover, as of March 31, 2017, Provinces and Territories continued to submit project lists to account for their full allocation.

As per the terms and conditions of the PTIF program, Infrastructure Canada reimburses eligible costs incurred within pre-defined cost sharing and stacking limits, following project approval. As such, actual spending was less than the total authorities available since few projects began incurring costs in 2016-17.

Audits completed or planned

Internal Audit of PTIF & CWWF - Approval Phase was undertaken and approved in December 2016.

Internal Audit of PTIF & CWWF - Governance Phase was undertaken in FY 2016-17, approval will occur in FY 2017-18.

Internal Audit of PTIF & CWWF – Payments and Reporting Phase is planned for completion in FY 2017-18.

An internal audit of the overall program is scheduled for completion in FY 2019-20.

Evaluations completed or planned

A combined evaluation of the Public Transit Infrastructure Fund and the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund is planned for completion in FY 2021-22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Provincial and Territorial governments have been accepting project proposals through consultation and engagement with municipalities to identify priorities. To date, Infrastructure Canada has received project lists from all jurisdictions and continues to work with each jurisdiction to commit their full PTIF funding allocation.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

0

0

0

844,414,816

37,169,257

37,169,257

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

0Footnote 38b

0Footnote 38c

0Footnote 38d

844,414,816Footnote 36b

37,169,257

37,169,257

Clean Water and Wastewater Fund (CWWF):

Name of transfer payment program

Clean Water and Wastewater Fund.

Start date

2016-2017

End date

2019-2020

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-2017Footnote 39

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Description

This program provides short-term funding of $2 billion to provide communities with more reliable water and wastewater systems so that both drinking water and effluent meet legislated standards. Infrastructure Canada enters into contribution agreements with all provinces and territories for the delivery of CWWF. In turn, provinces and territories enter into agreements with eligible ultimate recipients to manage projects. Under this cost-share program, federal funding from all sources can be up to 50% in provinces and 75% in territories of total eligible costs per project. All eligible projects are approved for CWWF funding by Infrastructure Canada and provinces and territories are required to report on progress at least on a semi-annual basis. The CWWF is designed to leverage funding through project partners to accelerate investments in capital water, wastewater, and storm water system projects, while ensuring federal accountability and oversight for the funding envelope.

Results achieved

All funding agreements with provinces and territories under CWWF have been signed by the applicable provinces and territories.

During 2016-17, a total of 923 projects with a federal contribution of $1.28 billion and total value of $2.49 billion have been approved under the program, accounting for 64% of overall program funding.

By March 31, 2017, construction had begun on 77 projects with a federal contribution of $180 million and a total value of $353 million. 6 projects are have already been completed.

Comments on variances

Funding agreements with Provinces and Territories were signed between June and September 2016. Moreover, as of March 31, 2017, Provinces and Territories continued to submit project lists to account for their full allocation.

As per the terms and references of the CWWF program, Infrastructure Canada reimburses eligible costs incurred, within pre-defined cost sharing and stacking limits, following project approval. As such, actual spending was less than the total authorities available since few projects began incurring costs in 2016-17.

Audits completed or planned

Internal Audit of PTIF & CWWF - Approval Phase was undertaken and approved in FY 2016-17.

Internal Audit of PTIF & CWWF - Governance Phase was undertaken in 2016-17, approval will occur in FY 2017-18.

Internal Audit of PTIF & CWWF – Payments and Reporting Phase is planned for completion in FY 2017- 18.

An internal audit of the overall program is scheduled for completion in FY 2019-20.

Evaluations completed or planned

A combined evaluation of the Public Transit Infrastructure Fund and the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund is planned for completion in FY 2021-22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Provincial and Territorial governments have been accepting project proposals through consultation and engagement with municipalities to identify priorities. To date, Infrastructure Canada has received project lists from all jurisdictions and continues to work with each jurisdiction to commit their full CWWF funding allocation.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

0

0

0

496,701,184

7,091,039

7,091,039

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

0Footnote 40

0Footnote 40b

0Footnote 40c

496,701,184Footnote 38e

7,091,039

7,091,039

Asset Management Fund (AMF):

Name of transfer payment program

Asset Management Fund.

Start date

2016-2017

End date

2021-2022

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-2017Footnote 41

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Description

The AMF provides $50 million for local asset management capacity building, supporting the development and implementation of municipal infrastructure asset management practices that will result in reliable data on infrastructure assets to bolster greater evidence-based decision making for strategic investments in communities across the country.

Infrastructure Canada entered into an agreement with the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM), which is responsible for delivering the program under the name of "Municipal Asset Management Program". The FCM will then transfer funding to recipient municipalities. Project selection is made at the municipal level, approved by the FCM and reported to the federal government.

Results achieved

Infrastructure Canada entered into an agreement with the FCM to act as a federal delivery partner to transfer funding from the AMF to municipalities.

Comments on variances

Infrastructure Canada and the FCM entered into an agreement in January 2017 to deliver the "Asset Management Fund". This caused delays in program launch which reduced certain administrative costs for 2016-17.

Audits completed or planned

No Internal Audit has been conducted of this program.

Evaluations completed or planned

A combined evaluation of the Asset Management Fund and the Capacity Building for Climate Change Challenges Fund is planned for completion in FY 2021-22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Infrastructure Canada continues to work with the FCM in the administration of the Asset Management Fund.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

0

0

0

7,500,000

783,800

783,800

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

0Footnote 42

0Footnote 42b

0Footnote 42c

7,500,000Footnote 40d

783,800

783,800

Capacity Building for Climate Change Challenges Fund (CB3CF):

Name of transfer payment program

Capacity Building for Climate Change Challenges Fund.

Start date

2016-2017

End date

2021-2022

Fiscal year for terms and conditions

2016-2017Footnote 43

Strategic Outcome

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

Link to department's Program Alignment Architecture

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Description

The Capacity Building for Climate Change Challenges Fund (CB3CF) provides $75 million to support increased municipal capacity to make low carbon and climate resilient infrastructure investments. Infrastructure Canada entered into an agreement with the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM), which is responsible for delivering the program under the name of "Municipalities for Climate Innovation Program". The FCM will then transfer funding to recipient municipalities. Project selection is made at the municipal level, approved by the FCM and reported to the federal government.

Results achieved

Infrastructure Canada entered into an agreement with the FCM to act as a federal delivery partner to transfer funding from the CB3CF to municipalities to help local governments understand and act on opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and strengthen municipal climate change resilience planning.

Comments on variances

Infrastructure Canada and the FCM entered into an agreement in January 2017 to deliver this program. This caused delays in program launch which reduced certain administrative costs for 2016-17.

Audits completed or planned

No Internal Audit has been conducted of this program.

Evaluations completed or planned

A combined evaluation of the Asset Management Fund and the Capacity Building for Climate Change Challenges Fund is planned for completion in FY 2021-22.

Engagement of applicants and recipients

Infrastructure Canada continues to work with the FCM in the administration of this program.

Performance Information (dollars)

Type of Transfer Payment

2014-2015
Actual spending

2015-2016
Actual spending

2016-2017
Planned spending

2016-2017
Total authorities available
for use

2016-2017
Actual spending
(authorities used)

Variance
(2016-2017
actual minus
2016-2017 planned)

Total grants

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total contributions

0

0Footnote 42d

0Footnote 42e

11,250,000Footnote 42f

738,700

738,700

Total other types of transfer payments

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total program

0Footnote 44

0Footnote 44b

0Footnote 44c

11,250,000Footnote 42g

738,700

738,700

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

  1. Overview of the Federal Government's Approach to Sustainable Development

    The Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) 2013–2016 presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act (FSDA). In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, Infrastructure Canada supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities found in this supplementary information table.

  2. Our Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

    Infrastructure Canada's Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) contains our actions in support of the following Theme of the 2013-16 FSDS:: Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government. The DSDS report for 2016-2017 presents a high level overview of results over and above those reported on in detail last year. Last year's DSDS progress report can be found here: http://www.infrastructure.gc.ca/pub/dpr-rmr/2016/2016-supp-eng.html#departmental.

  3. Infrastructure Canada's Highlights for Theme IV

    Theme IV – Shrinking the Environmental Footprint – Beginning with Government is separated into three goals: Greenhouse Gas Emission (GHG) and Energy, Asset and Waste Management, and Water Management.

    Green Procurement Reporting for Departments and Agencies are not bound by the Federal Sustainable Development Act but Infrastructure Canada is committed to addressing the Policy on Green Procurement. As such, the Department has continued to consider environmental aspects in its procurement of goods decision-making processes, which addresses Goal 7: waste and Asset Management, under Theme IV.

    FSDS goal

    FSDS target

    FSDS performance indicator

    FSDS performance results

    Goal 7: waste and asset management

    Reduce waste generated, and minimize the environmental impacts of assets throughout their life cycle.

    Target 7.2: green procurement

    As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

    Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place.

    Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in the given fiscal year.

    Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution toward green procurement, in the given fiscal year.

    Departmental performance indicators for departmental green procurement targets: Percentage of goods contracts that are compliant with green procurement policy.

    Infrastructure Canada has continued to address the Policy on Green Procurement.

    There were four procurement specialists in 2016-17. 100% of which had taken the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course.

    Performance evaluation of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management did not include support or contribution toward green procurement, as incumbents in some positions were in transition.

    81% of the Department's goods procurement were compliant with green procurement policy.

    Theme IV - Implementation Strategy Performance Summary 2016 – 2017

    • Supplier's lists for mandatory commodities under Public Services and Procurement Canada are used and have pre-established provisions for green procurement.
    • The Department has continued to purchase and lease energy-efficient equipment from companies that support environmental programs that have recycled content and recycling programs. The equipment uses multi-function photocopiers and printer machines to reduce energy consumption, uses recycled toner cartridges, implements a policy on standard shared printers versus personal printers, and ensures that default settings on printers and photocopiers are set to print double-sided, and on black and white colour.
    • The Department has combined photocopiers and printers, reducing the number of devices plugged in to reduce plug-load demand, i.e. contributing to lower energy consumption.
    • The Department has continued to implement material recycling bins in all locations, and ensures that all defective and end-of-life telecommunications devices and accessories are sent to vendors for recycling where they are re-used as telecommunications devices.
    • Meetings and conference organizers are encouraged to make arrangements according to green procurement principles, to reduce the use of disposable dishes that go into landfills, and to purchase goods from companies that offer green catering.
    • Video conferences and teleconferences have continued to be promoted as an alternative to travel, and government travel services have continued to be used to promote sustainable methods of transportation, and the use of green hotels.
  4. Report on Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA)

    The Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposalsi states that a Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is required when the implementation of a proposal submitted to an individual minister or Cabinet for approval may result in important environmental effects, either positive or negative. To ensure that the Cabinet Directive is being met, the Department undertakes a preliminary scan to identify the potential for important environmental effects when preparing a Memorandum to Cabinet and for other policy, plan and program initiatives, as appropriate. Should the potential for significant environmental impacts be identified and/or there is a high level of uncertainty or risk associated with the proposal, a SEA is carried out.

    Infrastructure Canada will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of the FSDS goals and targets through the SEA process. A SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on the FSDS goals and targets.

Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects

New Bridge for the St. Lawrence Corridor Project

Project name

New Champlain Bridge Corridor Project

Description

The existing Champlain Bridge is one of the busiest bridges in Canada with traffic estimated at over 40 million vehicles per year. It is a major Canada-United States trade corridor, handling $20 billion of international trade and 11 million transit commuters per year.

The New Champlain Bridge Corridor (NCBC) Project addresses the need to replace the Champlain Bridge and the temporary causeway (which was built as a temporary replacement to the Île-des-Soeurs Bridge), both having reached the end of their useful lives. The Project also offers an efficient solution to the movement of goods and people by widening the federally owned A15 Highway to a six-lane capacity. The NCBC project continues to be successfully implemented as a Public Private Partnership (P3) procurement model.

Project outcomes

  • Maintain the Safety and Efficiency of the Corridor;
  • Foster Sustainable Development and Urban Integration within the Montreal area;
  • Improving the flow of people and goods in the Montreal area;
  • Improving the safety of users through modern design aspects;
  • Designing bridges to connect Montreal with Île-des-Soeurs and the south shore with 125 year life expectancies.

Industrial benefits

Replacing the existing infrastructures, as well as widening the A15 Highway will mitigate any risk of disrupting the trade corridor and will improve the flow of traffic.

The project provides significant opportunities for local business to participate, notably in construction related aspect of the project's implementation.

The NCBC Project will provide lasting economic benefits to the municipalities on each side of the river and more broadly to the region as a whole.

Sponsoring department

Infrastructure of Canada

Contracting authority

Public Services and Procurement Canada

Participating departments

Public Services and Procurement Canada; Justice Canada; Fisheries and Oceans Canada; Environment and Climate Change Canada

Prime contractor

Private Partner
Signature on the Saint Lawrence Group
8, place du commerce
Montréal, Québec H3E 1P4

Project Financial and Business Advisor
Price Waterhouse Coopers
18 York St., Suite 2600
Toronto, ON M5J 0B2

Owner's Engineer
Arup Canada Inc.
600 Boulevard de Maisonneuve West, Office 750
Montréal, QC H3A 3J2

Major subcontractors

None

Project phase

The Private Partner advanced the construction of the project. The project team oversaw the implementation of the Project Agreement and managed agreements with external entities.

Major milestones

  • Environmental assessment is completed: October 2013
  • Launch of the procurement process - Request for Qualifications: March 2014
  • Beginning of acquisition of land: June 2014
  • Announcement of the design specifications for the New Bridge for the St. Lawrence: June 2014
  • Announcement of the three consortia invited to participate in the Request for Proposals process: July 2014
  • Announcement of the Preferred Proponent and beginning of the Early Work Agreement: April 2015
  • Signature of Project Agreement with the Private Partner and beginning of construction: June 2015
  • Scheduled completion of the construction of the New Champlain Bridge: December 2018
  • Scheduled completion of the construction of the Corridor: October 2019

Progress report and explanation of variances

  • Necessary authorities were provided in December 2013, April 2014, and June 2015 to carry out the NCBC project.
  • Budget 2014 supported the NCBC project by providing $165 million over a period of two years, in order to take on the preparatory work required for the project. Subsequent approval for expenditure authority was provided.
  • The construction cost for Canada was estimated at between
    $3 billion and $5 billion. In 2015, the Government of Canada confirmed that the project cost was $4,239 billion.
  • In April 2014, approval was provided to begin the acquisition of properties, as required for the Project.
  • In June 2015, the Government of Canada entered into a 34 year contractual agreement with a private partner, Signature on the Saint-Laurent Group. The Private Partner is responsible for carrying out the design, construction, financing, operation and maintenance work for the project.
  • The project is currently being implemented through a P3 contract.

Response to Parliamentary Committees and External Audits

Response to Parliamentary Committees

There were no parliamentary committee reports requiring a response in 2016–17.

Response to audits conducted by the Auditor General (including to the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development)

2016-2017 Auditor General Reports

There were no audits in 2016-17 requiring a response.

2015-2016 OAG Audit of Public Accounts
Independent Auditor's Opinion, Section 12 - Infrastructure and Communities

The Audit of Public Accounts was tabled in Fall 2016. The purpose of the audit was to express an opinion on whether the consolidated financial statements are fairly presented.

The auditor's opinion was that the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Government of Canada as at 31 March 2016.

There were no recommendations for Infrastructure Canada.

2016 Spring Reports of the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development

Report 1 - Federal Support for Sustainable Municipal Infrastructure

The audit assessed whether the objectives of the Gas Tax Fund and the Green Municipal Fund were being achieved, as well as whether Infrastructure Canada, working in collaboration with others, adequately coordinated the key federal programs under its responsibility.

There were three recommendations to Infrastructure Canada from the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development in 2016-2017 with respect to the Audit of Federal Support for Sustainable Municipal Infrastructure. Infrastructure Canada's response to the audit can be found on the Office of Auditor General of Canada Website. The recommendations, as well as the departmental response from May 2016, are summarized as follows:

Recommendation 1.29

Infrastructure Canada should work with the agreement signatories to develop an effective performance measurement strategy so that it has the information it needs to determine whether the objectives of the Gas Tax Fund have been achieved and to take corrective action when necessary. Infrastructure Canada should use this information to report on Gas Tax Fund outcomes to Parliament and the Canadian public.

Departmental Response:

Infrastructure Canada will work with signatories to develop an appropriate and effective performance measurement strategy to measure the outcomes.

The Department will implement a more practical performance reporting strategy for the Fund and will move forward with the three specific and measurable outcomes below:

  • provide municipalities with access to a predictable source of funding,
  • invest in community infrastructure, and
  • support and encourage long-term municipal planning and asset management.

The Department will work with signatories to collect the results of their next outcomes reports in 2018, and will use the performance information submitted by the provinces to report to Parliament and Canadians on the outcomes through the Departmental Results Report.

Recommendation 1.91

To support strategic and coordinated funding decisions, Infrastructure Canada should work with Statistics Canada and other parties, as necessary, to build a source of standardized, reliable, and regularly updated information on the inventory and condition of Canada's core public infrastructure.

Departmental Response:

In 2016, the Department will work with Statistics Canada to develop an action plan with implementation to follow in 2017.

Recommendation 1.100

Infrastructure Canada, in collaboration with its federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal partners, should:

  1. clarify the federal roles and responsibilities in relation to those of the other players making decisions related to municipal infrastructure funding, including identifying and managing environmental risks, such as those linked to climate change;
  2. address their needs for better information about municipal funding requirements, including nationally consistent asset inventories;
  3. provide support to municipalities in their adoption of good practices for asset management;
  4. clarify the federal roles in promoting the use of innovative approaches to municipal infrastructure projects that contribute to environmental and financial sustainability; and
  5. provide a long-term vision outlining federal infrastructure priorities, with clear objectives, performance measures, and accountability.
Departmental Response:
  1. Identification and consideration of environmental risks remain the responsibility of the asset manager. In the context of current programs, the federal role is to confirm that applicable risks, including environmental risks, have been considered by the asset owner and that it has taken measures to address those risks. This will be reflected more clearly in the context of applicable program information for asset managers and project proponents to be developed, in respect of new programming, or revised, in respect of current programming, over the 2016-17 fiscal year.
  2. Recognizing the need for improved data to support evidence-based decision making, the Department will work with Statistics Canada to develop plans to meet the Budget 2016 commitment, which was to improve infrastructure-related data, with implementation to follow in 2017.
  3. Budget 2016 announced $50 million in new funding for a new asset management fund designed to support the development and implementation of municipal infrastructure asset management practices, and data collection on infrastructure assets. Support for asset management is also reflected under the newly announced Public Transit Infrastructure Fund and the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund. The implementation of these funds will begin in the 2016-2017 fiscal year and take place over the following five years.

    Under the Gas Tax Fund, funding is available for municipalities to improve their asset management planning. All signatories have committed to ensure progress on the state of asset management planning by municipalities and will report on progress in 2018.
  4. As identified in Budget 2016, Phase 2 of the federal government's infrastructure plan signaled that the federal government will work over the next year with partners to examine new innovative financing mechanisms to increase the long-term affordability and sustainability of infrastructure in Canada.
  5. As part of the engagement on Phase 2, beginning in the spring of 2016, the Government of Canada will work with its provincial, territorial, municipal, and Indigenous partners, as well as other stakeholders, to determine longer-term infrastructure priorities through a clear identification of federal role and responsibilities, as well as federal and mutually identified objectives and outcomes. Phase 2 of the long-term plan will be introduced in 2017.

Report 2—Mitigating the Impacts of Severe Weather

This audit focused on the federal government's actions to support Canada's long-term mitigation efforts. It examined key federal organizations' data, information, tools, and funding that could help decision makers mitigate the effects of severe weather. The audit also examined whether the federal government was meeting its responsibilities to make Canada's infrastructure more resilient against severe weather events. Federal organizations audited were Environment and Climate Change Canada (formerly Environment Canada), Public Safety Canada, National Research Council Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and Infrastructure Canada. More specifically, the audit scope included federal funding programs of Public Safety Canada and Infrastructure Canada, including the New Building Canada Fund, that help provinces and territories increase infrastructure resilience against severe weather effects.

The audit concluded that the federal government has not provided adequate information and tools needed to support decision makers in their long-term efforts to mitigate the effects of severe weather. It also concluded that the federal government has not put in place funding provisions to significantly improve the resilience of Canada's infrastructure.

Overall, the Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development concluded that the federal government has not made it a priority to help decision makers mitigate the anticipated impacts of severe weather.

There were no recommendations for Infrastructure Canada.

Response to audits conducted by the Public Service Commission of Canada or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages

There were no audits in 2016–17 requiring a response.

Internal Audits and Evaluation

Internal Audits Completed in 2016-2017

Title of internal audit

Internal audit type

Completion date

Internal Policy Administration Review - Phase II

Advisory Engagement

June 2016

Audit of Internal Controls over Financial Reporting – Selected Business Processes

Internal Controls

June 2016

Information and Data Management Practices

Advisory Engagement

December 2016

Just-in-Time Audit of PTIF & CWWF - Approval Phase

Internal Controls

December 2016

Evaluations Completed in 2016-2017

Title of evaluation

Status

Deputy head approval date

Link to the department's programs

Evaluation of Green Infrastructure Fund

Completed

June 2016

Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Advisory engagement for a Performance Measurement initiative at Infrastructure Canada

Completed

Step 1 was completed in February 2017.

Step 2 is in progress and will be completed in September 2017.

All Infrastructure Canada programs and internal services

Evaluation of the New Building Canada Fund

In progress

September 2017

Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Horizontal Initiatives

Name of horizontal initiative

Investing in Canada Plan

Lead department

Infrastructure Canada

Federal partner organization

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, Canadian Heritage, Employment and Social Development Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, Health Canada, Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Parks Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Public Safety Canada, Transport Canada.*

Non-federal partners contributing financially to the initiative

Provincial, territorial, and municipal jurisdictions, as well as non-governmental organizations and private organizations are partnering with the federal government in the delivery of the Plan.

Start date of the horizontal initiative

April 1, 2016

End date of the horizontal initiative

March 31, 2028

Total federal funding allocated (start to end date) (dollars)

$95,551,000,000 (includes new investments from Budget 2016 and Budget 2017 only)

Total federal planned spending to date (dollars)

There is no planned spending for 2016-17 as this initiative was not presented in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

Total federal actual spending to date (dollars)

$1,984,697,666

Funding contributed by non-federal partners

Provincial, territorial, and municipal jurisdictions as well as private organizations and non-governmental organizations are sharing the costs of projects funded under the Investing in Canada Plan to varying levels depending on the various Budget 2016 programs terms and conditions. Funds leveraged from partners for the delivery of Budget 2016 programs are estimated to be over $6,815,913,000 in total.

Governance structures

The governance structure of the Investing in Canada Plan consists of a Ministerial level committee, a Deputy Ministers' committee, an Assistant Deputy Minister Data Strategies working group and three Director-level working groups, all led by INFC, as the lead department for the initiative.

The Ministerial level Investing in Canada Committee (ICC) is chaired by the Minister of Infrastructure and Communities. This committee serves as a consultation and collaboration forum for Ministers responsible for delivering the plan.

The ICC is supported by the Deputy Ministers' Coordinating Committee (DMCC), which is chaired by the Deputy Minister of Infrastructure Canada. The aim of the DMCC is to ensure interdepartmental coordination and oversight at the senior official level for the Investing in Canada Plan.

This governance structure is also supported by targeted working groups. An Assistant Deputy Ministers Data Strategies working group on will be established in order to support the data strategy for horizontal reporting on results.

In addition, there are three other working-level working groups chaired by INFC to facilitate reporting, coordinated communications approach, and information technology.

Contact Information

Alain Desruisseaux
Director General
Policy and Results Branch
180, Kent Street
Ottawa Ontario K1P 0B6
613-946-9922
alain.desruisseaux@canada.ca

* The Regional Development Agencies (RDAs) received funding for the Canada 150 Community Infrastructure Program. In order to avoid duplication of efforts, as they are already reporting through the separate Canada 150 Horizontal Initiative, they do not report under this Horizontal Initiative. These RDAs are: Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency; Canada Economic Development for Quebec Regions; Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency; Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario; Federal Economic Development Initiative for Northern Ontario; Western Economic Diversification Canada.

Results information

Description of the horizontal initiative

The Investing in Canada Plan is the Government of Canada's national strategy to address Canada's aging infrastructure and rebuild the nation for the 21st Century. Through the Investing in Canada plan, the Government of Canada is making historic new investments in infrastructure - more than doubling existing funding - to provide communities across the country with the tools they need to prosper and innovate. To do this, the federal government is investing more than $180 billion over 12 years in five main infrastructure priorities:

  • public transit infrastructure
  • green infrastructure
  • social infrastructure
  • trade and transportation infrastructure
  • rural and northern communities infrastructure

These investments will create long-term economic growth, build inclusive, sustainable communities and support a low carbon, green economy.

The initial phase of the plan, announced in Budget 2016, focuses on laying a foundation in the short term by accelerating existing federal infrastructure investments and providing $11.9 billion in additional funding for the rehabilitation, repair, and modernization of existing infrastructure.

Budget 2017 builds on this foundation with $81.2 billion in new funding, to be delivered over 11 years starting in 2017-18.

The Government of Canada is working closely with partners and stakeholders to deliver this ambitious plan that will make a real difference to Canadians and their communities.

Fiscal year of planned completion of next evaluation

There is no horizontal evaluation planned.

Shared outcome of federal partners

Improve the resilience of communities and transition to a clean growth economy

Investments will build more modern and sustainable communities; support Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions reduction; ensure infrastructure can withstand the impacts of climate change and extreme weather; reduce water, air and soil pollution; and ensure public infrastructure performs well and is in a state of good repair.

Example of performance indicators

  1. Percentage of Canadian municipalities with improved low carbon and resilience practices as a result of program
  2. Number of First Nations communities with improved solid waste infrastructure

Target(s)

  1. 20-25% by the end of program (March 31, 2021)
  2. 42 First Nations communities by March 31, 2018

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

See the Expected Results, Performance Indicators and Targets section

Results

  1. Not measured yet. Agreement was signed with the federal delivery partner (FCM) in January 2017.
  2. Six First Nations communities with improved solid waste infrastructure in FY 2016-17

Shared outcome of federal partners

Improve social inclusion and socio-economic outcomes of Canadians

Investments will build communities in which all Canadians have the opportunity to succeed by providing greater access to quality affordable housing, shelters, early learning and child care, cultural and recreational infrastructure, and reliable public transit. Investments will also support improved physical accessibility and safety for people with disabilities.

Example of performance indicators

  1. Number of new constructed units off-reserve
  2. Number of people placed in more stable housing through Homelessness Partnering Strategy interventions, including Housing First

Target(s)

  1. 3,000 new constructed units off-reserve by March 31, 2018
  2. 4,500 people placed in more stable housing in 2016-17 and 4,500 in 2017-18 (9,000 cumulative)

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

See the Expected Results, Performance Indicators and Targets section

Results

  1. 2,204 new constructed units off-reserve in FY 2016-17
  2. 1,996 people placed in more stable housing*

*Based on results received as of September 6, 2017. Not all results are in for 2016-17.

Shared outcome of federal partners

Create long term growth

Investments in 21st century infrastructure will strengthen Canada's economy for the future. In building smart cities, increasing the flow of trade through ports and airports, and by more efficiently moving goods and people through our congested cities, Canada will increase growth and create jobs for the middle class.

Example of performance indicators

TBD

Target(s)

TBD

Data source and frequency of monitoring and reporting

TBD

Results

Not measured yet.

Expected outcome or result of non-federal and non-governmental partners

Not applicable

Performance information

The first year of implementation of the Investing in Canada Plan, which results from Budget 2016 infrastructure investments, led to a large number of initiatives being launched or enhanced. In total, funding has been allocated to 31 specific initiatives unfolding over a period of five years, while focusing primarily on investments for rehabilitation of infrastructure over fiscal years 2016-17 and 2017-18. Ten federal departments and Crown corporations are delivering these programs in order to contribute to the expected outcomes of the plan.

During the fiscal year 2016-17, more than 70% of the Plan's funding announced in Budget 2016 was signed into agreements with delivery partners. This led to the approval of over 13,540 projects with a federal contribution of close to $7 billion, from which over 3,040 projects with a federal contribution of over $1.34 billion have been started.

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC)

Under the Investing in Canada Plan, a significant portion of the investments in housing are provided to provinces and territories (PT's) through bilateral agreements under the Investment in Affordable Housing (IAH). IAH supplementary agreements are in place with all 13 provinces and territories. CMHC had funding in 2016-17 under the following initiatives:

  • Doubling of the Investment in Affordable Housing: As at March 31, 2017, $261 M expended by CMHC for 2,419 projects to assist 8,891 households
  • Affordable Housing for Seniors: As at March 31, 2017, $100 M expended by CMHC for 933 projects to assist 3,169 households.
  • Affordable Housing for Victims of Family Violence: As at March 31, 2017, $60 M expended by CMHC for 3,114 projects to assist 4,331 households
  • Energy and Water Efficiency and Retrofit to Existing Social Housing: As at March 31, 2017, $500.1 M expended by CMHC for 2,200 projects to assist 89,812 households
  • Northern Housing: As at March 31, 2017, $40 M expended by CMHC for 41 projects to assist 183 households
  • Renovation and Retrofit of Existing Housing On-Reserve: As at March 31, 2017, $68.6 M expended by CMHC to renovate or retrofit 3,300 units
  • Skills and Capacity Development On-Reserve: As at March 31, 2017, $5 M expended by CMHC to assist 427 First Nation communities with skills and capacity development for the design, construction, inspection and overall management of housing on-reserve
  • Construction of new shelters for victims of family violence in First Nation communities On Reserve: As of March 31, 2017, five communities for the construction of five new shelters were selected. CMHC continues to work with the selected proponents to help move their projects towards a final commitment, at which point projects can get underway.

Canadian Heritage (PCH)

As a contributing agency to the implementation of the Investing in Canada Plan, the Department of Canadian Heritage helped to improve cultural spaces across the country through the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF).

Budget 2016 provided an additional $83.7 M for 2016-17 in the CCSF, which led to a significant increase in the number of cultural infrastructure projects supported by the program. In 2016-17, the CCSF approved funding for 247 new or improved cultural facilities. 60% of these projects target underserved communities, including Indigenous, ethnocultural, and official language minority communities as well as organizations that serve youth.

The CCSF supported projects that build Canadians' knowledge of Canada, including its history, symbols, and cultures. For example, the CCSF invested $4.5 M to create the Kenojuak Cultural Centre, located in Cape Dorset, Nunavut. A multipurpose facility, the Kenojuak Cultural Centre and Print Shop will be home to permanent and temporary exhibition galleries, purpose-built artists' studios with facilities for lithography, etching, drawing and stone cutting, and an Elder/community gathering space.

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

Through Budget 2016 Infrastructure investments, ESDC has received funding for the following programs: Enabling Accessibility Fund, Homelessness Partnering Strategy, First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative, and the Early Learning and Child Care investments with provinces and territories.

Enabling Accessibility Fund

  • Budget 2016 provided an additional $4 million over two years starting in 2016–2017 to fund additional small projects under the program's Community Accessibility Stream. As a result of the additional $2 million allocated for fiscal year 2016–2017, 85 additional small community projects stemming from the 2016 Call for Proposals were approved to receive funding. All funding agreements have been signed with recipients and 84 grants have been disbursed to recipients. One project has been postponed to start in February 2018 at the request of the recipient. Under the grant agreements, recipients have one year to complete their projects
  • The remaining $2 million will be allocated in fiscal year 2017-2018 to fund additional small projects stemming from the 2017 Call for Proposals.

Homelessness Partnering Strategy

  • Under the Homelessness Partnering Strategy in 2016-2017, 349 agreements were amended or approved across the country as a result of the top up funding provided to the program through Budget 2016, for a total value of $46,975,420. These investments have enhanced community-level efforts to tackle homelessness.

First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative

  • The First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative is a federal contributions program that supports culturally appropriate, affordable, quality child care services for children up to 12 years old in First Nations on-reserve and Inuit communities. Budget 2016 investments for Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care are to undertake urgent repairs and renovations of the facilities used by First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative. During 2016-2017, 210 child care facilities received $16.6 million in contribution funding to undertake urgent repairs and renovations to existing facilities. On March 31, 2017, 132 projects were completed, totaling $13,379,031. The remaining projects are underway and expected to be completed in 2017-2018.
  • Additional projects will be funded in 2017-2018 to support repairs and renovations, and other needs identified by child care centres as part of the $100 million in new funding announced in Budget 2016 towards Indigenous early learning and child care.

Early Learning and Child Care Investments with Provinces and Territories

  • Funding began in fiscal year 2017-2018 for the Early Learning and Child Care investments with provinces and territories, therefore there is nothing to report for fiscal year 2016-2017.

Health Canada (HC)

Budget 2016 provided $270 M over five years through the Investing in Canada Plan to improve health facilities on reserve and $51.2 M over two years for capital improvements to Aboriginal Head Start On Reserve (AHSOR) facilities.

During 2016-17, 39 community health funding infrastructure projects were started to improve health facility infrastructure, such as nursing stations, health centres and drug and alcohol treatment centres. These included three new building projects in the Atlantic, Ontario and Saskatchewan regions, all of which were completed.

During 2016-17, there were 71 AHSOR projects planned and approved. Fifty-six projects were completed in 2016-17. The delayed completion of the remaining projects is due to factors outside of the control of Health Canada (e.g., one project was part of a larger school project that is not yet complete, others were delayed due to winter conditions and the short construction season). Health Canada's regional offices are working actively with First Nations communities to keep track of the progress on these projects. Although some projects were delayed, HC's funding was fully contributed to communities as part of the multi-funder projects.

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)

Under the Investing in Canada Plan, INAC had funding for five initiatives in 2016-17.

Water and Wastewater:

  • As of March 31, 2017, INAC had approved 241 First Nations' water and wastewater projects across the country, including 30 projects aimed at addressing 52 long-term Drinking Water Advisories (DWAs). As of March 31, 2017, all of the funding (Vote 10 for this fiscal year) had been disbursed or committed through signed funding agreements. Total targeted infrastructure expenditures as of March 31, 2017 is $274.6 M.

First Nations Solid Waste Management Initiative:

  • In 2016-17 the First Nations Solid Waste Management Initiative supported 136 projects totaling $14.2 M. The funding was allocated to a variety of waste related initiatives with a focus on the planning and design work required to allocate much larger investments starting in 2017-18. Engagement with First Nations through regional events and community specific needs assessment activities were undertaken. A National Advisory Committee was established and held its first meeting in March.

Housing for First Nations on Reserve:

  • As of March 31, 2017, 961 projects had been approved and the total targeted funding amount for this fiscal year had been disbursed or committed through signed funding agreements. Total targeted investment as of March 31, 2017 is $273.1 M.

Inuit Housing:

  • In 2016-17, $25.5 M was provided to Inuit land claim holders in Nunavik (Quebec), Nunatsiavut (Labrador) and Inuvialuit (Northwest Territories). The funds have been used to purchase and ship construction materials to the Inuit regions that will be used in 2017-18 to construct approximately 193 new housing units.

Cultural and Recreational Centers:

  • As of March 31, 2017, 197 projects had been approved and the total targeted funding amount for this fiscal year had been disbursed or committed through signed funding agreements. Total targeted infrastructure expenditures as of March 31, 2017 is $47.4 M.

Infrastructure Canada (INFC)

Under the Investing in Canada Plan, INFC had funding for six initiatives in 2016-17.

  • Under the Public Transit Infrastructure Fund, all funding agreements with provinces and territories under PTIF have been signed by the applicable provinces and territories. During 2016-17, a total of 738 projects with a federal contribution of $1.57 B and total value of $3.16 B have been approved under the program, accounting for 46% of overall program funding. By March 31, 2017, construction had begun on 86 projects with a federal contribution of $447 M and a total value of $894 M.
  • Under the Clean Water and Wastewater Fund, all funding agreements with provinces and territories have also been signed by the applicable provinces and territories. During 2016-17, a total of 923 projects with a federal contribution of $1.28 B and total value of $2.49 B have been approved under the program, accounting for 64% of overall program funding. By March 31, 2017, construction had begun on 77 projects with a federal contribution of $180 M and a total value of $353 M. Six projects have already been completed.
  • In January 2017, INFC entered into an agreement with the Federation of Canadian Municipalities to act as a federal delivery partner to transfer funding from the Asset Management Fund and the Capacity Building for Climate Change Challenges Fund to municipalities.
  • The initiative on Codes, Guides and Specifications for Climate-Resilient Public Infrastructure is managed by the National Research Council through a Memorandum of Understanding signed with INFC in November 2016. The first year of implementation led to the accomplishment of key deliverables in 2016-17, including research reports, consultant reports, and stakeholder engagement.
  • Under the Adaptation and Climate Resistant Infrastructure Projects initiative announced in Budget 2016, INFC is contributing to two specific projects under the terms and conditions of the Provincial and Territorial Infrastructure Component - National and Regional Project of the New Building Canada Fund. During 2016-17, INFC has signed in August 2016 the contribution agreement with the recipient for the Lions Gate Secondary Wastewater Treatment Plant project in Vancouver, thus achieving an important milestone towards construction, expected to begin in 2017-18. For the Lake Manitoba/Lake St. Martin Outlet Channels project in Manitoba, negotiations have continued and are still underway.

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)

  • Under the Demonstration component of the first phase of the Electric Vehicle and Alternative Fuel Infrastructure program, a national call for proposals was completed in 2016-17, resulting in the allocation of 100% of available funding (NRCan $46.1 M funding over two years) to nine demonstration projects, and three demonstration projects that advance next generation electric vehicle infrastructure technologies were started, resulting in disbursements of $0.9 M matched 1:1 by project recipients and partners. The suite of projects is expected to result in $86 M (2:1) in leveraged investment over three years. 2016-17 was the first of three years to complete all projects. Information on the three projects that started in 2016-17 is as follows:
    • AddÉnergie, commenced its project to add up to 1,000 next-generation charging stations, over three years, to its FLO Charging Network, including approximately 200 publicly accessible stations. Specifically in 2016-17, the company focused on developing three new and innovative technical and business solutions, including (i) next-generation faster charging (level 3) stations, (ii) an innovative business model looking at Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) for Canadians and businesses, and (iii) the design and implementation of charging stations specifically designed for street-side installation in five Canadian cities.
    • CrossChasm Technologies Inc. (doing business as FleetCarma) shipped 850 of 1,000 planned devices to drivers of electric vehicles (EVs) in nine Canadian provinces. Most of these devices have been installed, and are collecting EV utilization and charging data, which will be used to inform future siting of EV charging stations and electric grid upgrades across Canada. The company has also started analyzing data from charging station networks, electricity meters, and its devices to provide insight into the demonstration of an EV charging reimbursement system for multi-unit residential buildings.
    • Entrepreneurs at FAST Charge TCH established a new company, raised private sector capital, established partnerships with industry and the University of Toronto, and began development of the first demonstration unit, each with three charging heads and battery storage with optional solar panels, for a network that will include 34 charging stations along the Trans-Canada Highway, in northern Ontario and Manitoba.
  • Under the Deployment component of the first phase of the Electric Vehicle and Alternative Fuel Infrastructure program ($16.4 M in Budget 2016), 15 projects totaling $4.1 M were started in 2016-2017. The first seven projects supporting the construction of 25 new fast-charging stations in Ontario by AddÉnergie were announced in December 2016.
  • The Regional Electricity Cooperation and Strategic Infrastructure program ($2.5 M in Budget 2016) is engaged in identifying, studying and seeking consensus on the best electricity infrastructure projects for significantly reducing GHG emissions. NRCan has established two regional dialogues (Atlantic and Western) with energy ministries and utilities. In each region, a $470 K agreement has been signed with a proponent agency (Nova Scotia Power and the Alberta Electric System Operator) for studies to identify the most promising options. Contractors were selected and continue to engage with dialogue participants to deliver study results by the end of FY 2017-18.

Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC)

  • The Green Municipal Fund was established to enhance Canadians' quality of life by improving air, water and soil quality and protecting the climate, and supports grants, loans and loan guarantees to encourage investment in environmental municipal projects. The Government of Canada endowed the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) with a total of $550 M for this initiative through a series of budget decisions from 2000 to 2005. Under Budget 2016, a new commitment provided a top-up of $125 M to the Green Municipal Fund to increase federal investments in green infrastructure ($62.5 M from NRCan and $62.5M from ECCC). In 2016-17 negotiations started with the FCM on the funding agreement.

Parks Canada (PC)

Under the Investing in Canada Plan, Parks Canada has expanded the National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places and is now making financial assistance available to all heritage places formally recognized by the federal government, including national historic sites, heritage lighthouses and heritage railway stations that are neither owned nor administered by the Government of Canada. These celebrated places are the source of great national pride and it is important to preserve them for future generations.

  • A total of 91 proposals were received for 2016-17 of which 72 projects were approved for a federal contribution of $10 M. By  March 31, 2017, 37 projects had been completed for a federal contribution of $3.7 M and a total value of $8.7 M with matching funds, and another 32 projects were extended into 2017-18. Additionally, 64 applications were received for 2017-18.

Performance summary

Federal organizations

Link to departmental Program Alignment Architectures

Contributing programs and activities

Link to department's Strategic Outcomes

Total allocation (from start to end date) (dollars)

2016-17 Planned spending (dollars)*

2016-17 Actual spending (dollars)

2016-17 Expected results, performance indicators, targets and actual results

Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation

Sub-program 1.2.1.3 Investments in Affordable Housing

Investment in Affordable Housing

1.0 Canadians in need have access to affordable housing

504,400,000

N/A

260,992,554

ER3 - PI3.1 - T3.1 - AR3.1
ER3 - PI3.2 - T3.2 - AR3.2
ER3 - PI3.3 - T3.3 - AR3.3
ER3 - PI3.4 - T3.4 - AR3.4

Sub-program 1.2.1.3 Investments in Affordable Housing

Increasing Affordable Housing for Seniors

1.0 Canadians in need have access to affordable housing

200,700,000

N/A

100,000,000

ER3 - PI3.5 - T3.5 - AR3.5

Sub-program 1.2.1.3 Investments in Affordable Housing

Supporting Shelters for Victims of Family Violence

1.0 Canadians in need have access to affordable housing

89,900,000

N/A

60,000,000

ER3 - PI3.6 - T3.6 - AR3.6

Sub-program 1.2.1.2 Renovation Programs Off Reserve

Renovation and Retrofit of Social Housing

1.0 Canadians in need have access to affordable housing

573,900,000

N/A

500,065,949

ER3 - PI3.7 - T3.7 - AR3.7

Sub-program 1.2.1.4 : Short-Term Affordable Housing Initiatives

Northern Housing

1.0 Canadians in need have access to affordable housing

97,700,000

N/A

40,000,000

ER3 - PI3.8 - T3.8 - AR3.8
ER3 - PI3.9 - T3.9 - AR3.9
ER3 - PI3.10 - T3.10 - AR3.10
ER3 - PI3.11 - T3.11 - AR3.11

Sub-program 1.2.2.2 Renovation Programs On Reserve

Renovation and Retrofit On Reserve

1.0 Canadians in need have access to affordable housing

127,700,000

N/A

68,568,246

ER3 - PI3.18 - T3.18 - AR3.18

Sub-program 1.2.2.2 Renovation Programs On Reserve

Shelters for First Nations Victims of Family Violence

1.0 Canadians in need have access to affordable housing

10,400,000

N/A

0

ER3 - PI3.19 - T3.19 - AR3.19
ER3 - PI3.20 - T3.20 - AR3.20

Sub-program 1.2.2.3 Aboriginal Capacity Development

Aboriginal Capacity and Skills Development

1.0 Canadians in need have access to affordable housing

10,000,000

N/A

5,000,010

ER3 - PI3.21 - T3.21 - AR3.21

Internal Services

N/A

0

N/A

0

N/A

Canadian Heritage

Sub-program 1.1.2: Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Canada Cultural Spaces Fund

Canadian artistic expressions and cultural content are created and accessible at home and abroad.

167,581,483

N/A

79,932,888

ER4 - PI4.1 - T4.1 - AR4.1
ER4 - PI4.2 - T4.2 - AR4.2
ER4 - PI4.3 - T4.3 - AR4.3

Internal Services

N/A

326,105

N/A

171,865

N/A

Employment and Social Development Canada

Sub-Program 4.2.5: Enabling Accessibility Fund

Enabling Accessibility Fund

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

4,000,000Footnote 45

N/A

1,982,333

ER4.5 – PI4.5 – T4.5 – AR4.5

Sub-Program 4.2.1: Homelessness Partnering Strategy

Homelessness Partnering Strategy

Income security, access to opportunities and well-being for individuals, families and communities

106,989,070

N/A

46,335,954Footnote 46

ER3.12 – PI3.12 – T3.12 – AR3.12

Sub-program 2.1.9: Aboriginal Skills and Employment Training Strategy

First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative

A skilled, adaptable and inclusive labour force and an efficient labour market

60,359,362Footnote 47

N/A

13,379,031

ER4.10 – PI4.10 – T4.10 – AR4.10

Internal Services

N/A

7,192,589Footnote 48

N/A

3,073,245Footnote 49

N/A

Health Canada

Sub-Sub-Program 3.3.1.3:Health Facilities

Health Facilities Program

First Nations and Inuit communities and individuals receive health services and benefits that are responsive to their needs so as to improve their health status

213,357,768*

N/A

93,010,771

ER4 - PI4.8 - T4.8 - AR4.8
ER4 - PI4.9 - T4.9 - AR4.9

Internal Services

N/A

949,958

N/A

574,971

N/A

Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

Sub-program 3.4.1: Water and Wastewater

Water and Wastewater**

The Land and Economy

610,957,302

N/A

281,936,581

ER1 - PI1.1 - T1.1 - AR1.1
ER1 - PI1.2 - T1.2 - AR1.2
ER1 - PI1.3 - T1.3 - AR1.3
ER1 - PI1.4 - T1.4 - AR1.4
ER1 - PI1.5 - T1.5 - AR1.5

Sub-Programs 3.2.4: Contaminated Sites (On-Reserve)

First Nations Waste Management Initiative**

The Land and Economy

111,116,055

N/A

15,107,590

ER1 - PI1.6 - T1.6 - AR1.6
ER1 - PI1.7 - T1.7 - AR1.7

Sub-Programs 3.4.3: Housing

On-Reserve Housing Funds

The Land and Economy

414,836,246

N/A

277,383,561

ER3 - PI3.13 - T3.13 - AR3.13
ER3 - PI3.14 - T3.14 - AR3.14
ER3 - PI3.15 - T3.15 - AR3.15
ER3 - PI3.16 - T3.16 - AR3.16

Sub-Programs 3.4.3: Housing

Inuit Housing

The Land and Economy

80,000,000

N/A

25,500,000

ER3 - PI3.17 - T3.17 - AR3.17

Sub-program 3.4.4: Other Community Infrastructure and Activities

First Nations Infrastructure Fund - Cultural and Recreational Centers

The Land and Economy

75,064,862

N/A

47,888,678

ER4 - PI4.6 - T4.6 - AR4.6
ER4 - PI4.7 - T4.7 - AR4.7

Internal Services

N/A

6,359,581

N/A

3,155,963

N/A

Infrastructure Canada

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Asset Management Fund

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

50,000,000

N/A

851,429

ER5 - PI5.1 - T5.1 - AR5.1

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Capacity Building for Climate Change Challenges fund

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

75,000,000

N/A

807,303

ER1 - PI1.14 - T1.14 - AR1.14
ER5 - PI5.2 - T5.2 - AR5.2

Program 1.4: Large-Scale Infrastructure Investments

NBCF-PTIC-NRP: Adaptation and Climate Resistant Infrastructure Projects

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

412,725,000

N/A

142,222

ER1 - PI1.15 - T1.15 - AR1.15
ER1 - PI1.16 - T1.16 - AR1.16

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Codes, Guides and Specifications for Climate-Resilient Public Infrastructure

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

40,000,000

N/A

4,000,000

ER5 - PI5.3 - T5.3 - AR5.3

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Clean Water and Wastewater Fund

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

1,993,487,985

N/A

7,360,365

ER1 - PI1.13 - T1.13 - AR1.13

Program 1.3: Investments in National Infrastructure Priorities

Public Transit Infrastructure Fund

Public Infrastructure for a More Prosperous Canada

3,381,503,777

N/A

37,501,568

ER2 - PI2.1 - T2.1 - AR2.1

Internal Services

N/A

N/A***

N/A***

N/A***

N/A

Natural Resources Canada

Sub-program 2.1.3: Alternative Transportation Fuels
Sub-program 2.2.3: Clean Energy Science and Technology

Electric Vehicle and Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Deployment and Technology Demonstration

Natural Resource Sectors and Consumers are Environmentally Responsible

61,656,012

N/A

3,681,770

ER1 - PI1.8 - T1.8 - AR1.8
ER1 - PI1.9 - T1.9 - AR1.9
ER1 - PI1.10 - T1.10 - AR1.10

Sub-program 2.1.2 Support for Clean Energy Decision Making

Regional Electricity Cooperation and Strategic Infrastructure

Natural Resource Sectors and Consumers are Environmentally Responsible

2,245,130

N/A

462,744

ER1 - PI1.11 - T1.11 - AR1.11
ER1 - PI1.12 - T1.12 - AR1.12

Internal Services

N/A

919,096

N/A

304,405

N/A

Parks Canada

Sub-Program 1.2.5: Other Heritage Places Conservation

National Cost-Sharing Program for Heritage Places

Canadians have a strong sense of connection to their national parks, national historic sites, heritage canals and national marine conservation areas and these protected places are experienced in ways that leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of present and future generations.

19,806,350

N/A

5,525,670

ER4 - PI4.4 - T4.4 - AR4.4

Internal Services

N/A

0

N/A

0

N/A

Sub-Total

N/A

Total Allocation

9,495,386,402

N/A

1,977,417,217

N/A

Sub-Total

N/A

Total Internal Services

15,747,329

N/A

7,280,449

N/A

Total for all federal organizations

9,511,133,731

N/A

1,984,697,666

N/A

* Funding for this initiative was announced for five years. However, only two years were accessed via a Treasury board submission in 2016-17 and subsequent approval will be required to access future funding.
** Funding for both initiatives was announced for five years. However, only two years were accessed via a Treasury board submission in 2016-17 and subsequent approval will be required to access future funding.
*** INFC’s expenditures for internal services are not tracked by funding source, therefore cannot be identified for this table.
Note: There is no planned spending for 2016-17 as this horizontal initiative was not presented in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities (RPP).

Expected Results, Performance Indicators, Targets and Actual Results

Expected Result

Department

Performance Indicator

Target

Actual Result

ER1: Environmental quality is improved, GHG emissions are reduced and resilience of communities is increased

INAC

PI1.1: Number of long-term drinking water advisories affecting First Nation drinking water systems financially supported by INAC

T1.1: 31 by March 31, 2019

AR1.1: 70 as of March 31, 2017

INAC

PI1.2: Percentage of on-reserve INAC-funded First Nation drinking water systems that have low risk rating

T1.2: 54% by March 31, 2019

AR1.2: 56% as of March 31, 2017

INAC

PI1.3: Percentage of on-reserve INAC-funded First Nation wastewater systems that have low risk ratings

T1.3: 65% by March 31, 2019

AR1.3: 43% as of March 31, 2017

INAC

PI1.4: Number of Budget 2016 water and wastewater infrastructure projects completed and operational in First Nation communities

T1.4: 40 per fiscal year

AR1.4: 30 in 2016-17

INAC

PI1.5: Number of Budget 2016 water and wastewater infrastructure projects underway in First Nation communities

T1.5: 140 projects per year (including the 40 projects completed per year)

AR1.5: 204 in 2016-17

INAC

PI1.6: Number of First Nations communities with improved solid waste programming

T1.6: 64 by March 31, 2018

AR1.6: 153 First Nations communities with improved solid waste programming as of March 31, 2017

INAC

PI1.7: Number of First Nations communities with improved solid waste infrastructure

T1.7: 42 by March 31, 2018

AR1.7: Six First Nations communities with improved solid waste infrastructure as of March 31, 2017

NRCan

PI1.8: Number of electric vehicle and alternative fuel stations on key coast-to-coast transportation corridors, by fuel type

T1.8: An increase in the number of electric vehicle and alternative fuel stations on key coast-to-coast transportation corridors, by fuel type, in line with the number of stations funded under the proposals

AR1.8: 30 deployment projects have been selected, which, if all are completed successfully, will result in the installation of 80 fast chargers, nine natural gas stations, and three hydrogen stations by March 31, 2018.

NRCan

PI1.9: Number of next-generation EV charging stations

T1.9: More than 200 publicly available next-generation EV charging stations installed.

AR1.9: Nine demonstration projects have been selected allocating 100% of funding. Three demonstration projects that advance next- generation electric vehicle (EV) infrastructure technologies began in 2016-17. Two projects started product development for new, innovative fast charging and curbside charging stations, which are expected to result, by project end in March 2019, in the deployment of up to 1,000 additional charging stations (including approximately 200 publicly accessible stations) and 34 charging stations along the Trans-Canada Highway in northern Ontario and Manitoba. The third project recruited 85% of users and started to collect EV utilization and charging data to inform future sites for EV charging stations and electric grid updates across Canada.

NRCan

PI1.10: Change in the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of technologies demonstrated

T1.10: Increase in TRL for technologies supported to TRL 7-9 at the end of the three year project.

AR1.10: For the three projects commenced in 2016-17, technologies to be developed and demonstrated were at TRL 4-5 at the beginning of the project.

NRCan

PI1.11: Establishment of regional electricity dialogues and continued engagement

T1.11: Two regional dialogues which continue to engage over program life

AR1.11: Western and Atlantic dialogues have been established. Dialogue participants continue to engage to deliver on report which is expected by the end of FY 2017-18

NRCan

PI1.12: Joint studies on enhancing electricity cooperation and increasing interprovincial electricity trade and transmission

T1.12: One final report per dialogue

AR1.12: Pending by end of 2017-18

INFC

PI1.13: Number of completed water and wastewater infrastructure projects

T1.13: TBD

AR1.13: During 2016-17, a total of 923 projects with a federal contribution of $1.28 billion and total value of $2.49 billion have been approved under the program, accounting for 64% of overall program funding. By March 31, 2017, construction had begun on 77 projects with a federal contribution of $180 million and a total value of $353 million. 6 projects have already been completed.

INFC

PI1.14: Number of tonnes of GHG emission expected to be reduced through program funded initiatives as a result of plans, studies, operational changes and pilot projects

T1.14: 200,000 tonnes (one time total)

1.5 million tonnes (cumulative)

AR1.14: No results measured yet. Agreement was signed with the federal delivery partner (FCM) in January 2017.

INFC

PI1.15: Completion of Lions Gate Wastewater Treatment Plant Project

T1.15: TBD

AR1.15: Contribution agreement signed in August 2016.

INFC

PI1.16: Completion of Lake Manitoba/Lake St. Martin Outlet Channel Project

T1.16: TBD

AR1.16: Negotiation was still underway in 2016-17.

ER2: Mobility is improved in Canadian urban communities

INFC

PI2.1: Number of completed public transit infrastructure projects

T2.1: TBD

AR2.1: During 2016-17, a total of 738 projects with a federal contribution of $1.57 billion and total value of $3.16 billion have been approved under the program, accounting for 46% of overall program funding. By March 31, 2017, construction had begun on 86 projects with a federal contribution of $447 million and a total value of $894 million.

ER3: Housing is affordable and in good condition and homelessness is reduced year over year.

CMHC

PI3.1: Number of new constructed units off-reserve

T3.1: 3,000 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.1: 2,204 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.2: Number of renovated units off-reserve

T3.2: 14,000 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.2: 3,107 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.3: Number of assisted units for independent living for persons with disabilities and victims of family violence off reserve

T3.3: 5,000 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.3: 279 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.4: Number of low income household benefiting from rental assistance off-reserve

T3.4: 78,000 low income households by March 31, 2018

AR3.4: 3,301 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.5: Number of assisted units for seniors off-reserve

T3.5: 5,000 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.5: 3,169 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.6: Number of units in shelters or transitional housing renovated or constructed off-reserve

T3.6: 3,000 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.6: 4,331 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.7: Number of units repair and retrofitted for condition and energy-efficiency improvement off-reserve

T3.7: 100,000 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.7: 89,812 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.8: Number of new constructed units in the North

T3.8: 365 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.8: 150 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.9: Number of renovated units in the North

T3.9: 215 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.9: 33 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.10: Number of units supported through shelter assistance in the North

T3.10: 11 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.10: 0 as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.11: Number of units supported through accessibility modifications in the North

T3.11: 9 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.11: 0 as of March 31, 2017

ESDC

PI3.12: Number of people placed in more stable housing through Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS) interventions, including Housing First

T3.12: 4,500 in 2016-17 and 4,500 in 2017-18 (9,000 cumulative)

AR3.12: 1,996*

*Based on results received as of September 6, 2017. Not all results are in for 2016-17.

INAC

PI3.13: Percentage of First Nations housing that is adequate* as assessed and reported annually by First Nations

* Adequate is defined in the Year-end Reporting Handbook for the Housing Data Collection Instrument as dwellings that do not require major renovations and possess basic plumbing facilities, hot and cold running water, inside toilets, and installed baths or showers.

T3.13: 75% by March 31, 2019 (from 72% in 2011)

AR3.13: 73% as of March 31, 2017

INAC

PI3.14: Percentage of First Nation dwellings that are in need of repair as assessed and reported annually by First Nations.

T3.14: 25% by March 31, 2019 (from 27% in 2016)

AR3.14: 27% as of March 31, 2017

INAC

PI3.15: Number of Budget 2016 housing projects completed and in use in First Nations communities

T3.15: 956 by March 31, 2018

AR3.15: Total number of projects funded: 961

Number of units completed as of March 31, 2017, detailed as follows (993 units):

  • Lot servicing: 105 lots
  • New unit construction: 267 units
  • Renovation & additions: 621 units

INAC

PI3.16: Number of Budget 2016 housing projects underway in First Nations communities

T3.16: 956 by March 31, 2017

AR3.16: Total number of projects funded: 961

Number of units under construction, service, or renovation as of March 31, 2017, detailed as followed (2138 units):

  • Lot servicing: 164 lots
  • New unit construction: 688 units
  • Renovation & additions: 1,286 units

INAC

PI3.17: Number of new household units constructed and repaired/renovated in the Inuit regions of Nunavik (Quebec), Nunatsiavut (Newfoundland and Labrador) and the Inuvialuit (Northwest Territories).

T3.17: Up to 250 new housing units constructed and repairs/renovations by end of FY 2017-18

Note: Recipients have the flexibility to allocate funds to new construction or repairs/renovations. The indicator of 250 units is based on all funds being allocated to new construction given that it is not possible at this time to estimate what portion of funds will be used for repairs/renovations.

AR3.17: Building materials were purchased and shipped to the Inuit regions so that the construction of new housing units can commence in 2017-18.

CMHC

PI3.18: Number of renovated and retrofitted units on Reserve

T3.18: 3,000-4,000 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.18: 3,300 units as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.19: Number of new shelters on reserve

T3.19: Up to 5 shelters by March 31, 2018

AR3.19: 0 as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.20: Number of renovated shelters on reserve

T3.20: Up to 20 units by March 31, 2018

AR3.20: 0 as of March 31, 2017

CMHC

PI3.21: Number of First Nations communities assisted

T3.21: 100 communities by March 31, 2018

AR3.21: 427 First Nation communities as of March 31, 2017

ER4: Canadian communities are more inclusive and accessible

PCH

PI4.1: Number of facilities built and/or renovated

T4.1: 70 by March 31, 2017

AR4.1: 153 as of March 31, 2017

PCH

PI4.2: Number of specialized equipment purchases

T4.2: 85 by March 31, 2017

AR4.2: 84 as of March 31, 2017

PCH

PI4.3: Number of communities reached by type (urban, rural, remote)

T4.3: 50% or more for rural and remote.

Historical baselines are:

  • Urban (48%);
  • Rural (34%); and
  • Remote (18%)

AR4.3: 56% for rural and remote

  • Urban: 61 (44%)
  • Rural: 49 (35%)
  • Remote: 29 (21%)

PC

PI4.4: Number of heritage places where threats to cultural resources have been mitigated or reduced through cost-sharing agreements

T4.4: 61 by March 31, 2017 and 46 by March 31, 2018

AR4.4: 37 heritage places as of March 31, 2017 (31 projects extended into FY 2017-18 to avoid undue hardships in delivery)

ESDC

PI4.5: Number of small projects funded improving physical accessibility and safety for people with disabilities in Canadian communities.

T4.5: At least 40 additional small projects funded per fiscal year (for 2016-17 and 2017-18). Baseline is 459 small projects funded yearly.

AR4.5: 84 additional small community projects funded as of March 31, 2017.

INAC

PI4.6: Number of Budget 2016 cultural/recreational infrastructure projects completed and in use in First Nations communities

T4.6: 71 of 2016-2017 selected projects completed by March 31, 2017

AR4.6: 44 as of March 31, 2017

INAC

PI4.7: Number of Budget 2016 cultural/recreational infrastructure projects underway in First Nations communities

T4.7: 159 of 2016-2017 selected projects underway by March 31, 2017

AR4.7: 153 as of March 31, 2017

HC

PI4.8: Number of health facilities that have been replaced or undergone renovations to improve quality.

T4.8: Completion of three new build projects by March 31, 2017.

Completion of 32 new build projects by March 31, 2018, including eight projects in British Columbia (BC) falling under the administrative authority of the BC First Nations Health Authority (FNHA).

Completion of nine major renovation projects by March 31, 2018, including one project in BC being undertaken by the BC FNHA.

AR4.8: Three new builds were completed in 2016-17 in the following regions: Atlantic, Saskatchewan and Ontario.

HC

PI4.9: Number of projects completed to improve the quality of facilities where Aboriginal Head Start On-Reserve (AHSOR) programming is being delivered.

T4.9: Completion of 71 projects, including 41 projects in British Columbia (BC) falling under the administrative BC First Nations Health Authority (FNHA).

AR4.9: In 2016-17, there were 71 projects approved under this program. 56 projects were completed in 2016-17, including several building designs for new AHSOR facilities and some replacement of AHSOR facilities. Numerous repair and renovation projects were also undertaken, including painting, general repairs and carpentry and playground improvements.

ESDC

PI4.10: Number of existing child care facilities repaired, rehabilitated, or upgraded.

T4.10: 210 projects funded in fiscal year 2016-17.

AR4.10: 210 projects were funded. 132 projects out of these 210 were completed in 2016-17. The remaining projects are expected to be completed in 2017-18.

ER5: Infrastructure is managed in a more sustainable way.

INFC

PI5.1: Percentage of Canadian municipalities with improved asset management practices as a result of program

T5.1: 20-25% by the end of program (March 31, 2021)

AR5.1: Not measured yet. Agreement was signed with the federal delivery partner (FCM) in January 2017.

INFC

PI5.2: Percentage of Canadian municipalities with improved low carbon and resilience practices as a result of program

T5.2: 15% by the end of program (March 31, 2021)

AR5.2: Not measured yet. Agreement was signed with the federal delivery partner (FCM) in January 2017.

INFC

PI5.3: New codes and guides are finalized and made available across Canada

T5.3: New codes and guides completed and made available across Canada by 2020-21

AR5.3: First year of implementation led to the accomplishment of key deliverables in 2016-17, including research reports, consultant reports, and stakeholder engagement

Footnotes

Footnote 1

Allocations for Transfer Payment Programs include Contributions only, and do not include Operating and Maintenance (O&M).

Return to Footnote 1

Footnote 2

The funding profile under the Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund was extended until 2019-2020 for certain projects.

Return to Footnote 2

Footnote 3

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

Return to Footnote 3

Footnote 4

Of the $4.3 billion originally allocated to the CSIF, $50 million was transferred to the Parks Canada Agency to support a high priority infrastructure project. These funds were reallocated through Estimates processes prior to 2015-2016. In addition, $12.8 million was also removed from the CSIF funding envelope through various government-wide reduction and reallocation exercises prior to the 2010 Strategic Review.

Return to Footnote 4

Footnote 5

The funding profile under the Border Infrastructure Fund was extended until 2019-20 for certain projects.

Return to Footnote 5

Footnote 6

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

Return to Footnote 6

Footnote 7

There was no 2016-17 Total Authorities Available for use and no 2016-17 Actual Spending under this program in 2016-17. The 2016-17 Planned Spending was not required in 2016-17 and was re-profiled to future years. Some projects under this program are still ongoing.

Return to Footnote 7

Footnote 8

Legislation enacting permanent funding for the Gas Tax Fund received Royal Assent on December 15, 2011.

Return to Footnote 8

Footnote 9

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

Return to Footnote 9

Footnote 10

These results are based on 2015-16 as the lists of projects funded in 2016-17 were not yet available at the time of publication.

Return to Footnote 10

Footnote 11

Funding under this program typically represents statutory spending. However the 2016-17 Actual Spending also includes Voted spending, which is the transfer of legacy funding to provinces and territories through the Gas Tax Fund. The transfer of Voted spending through the Gas Tax Fund ensures that funds are directed towards municipal infrastructure priorities in the near term.

Return to Footnote 11

Footnote 12

The funding profile under the Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Base Fund was extended until 2018-2019 for certain provinces and territories.

Return to Footnote 12

Footnote 13

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

Return to Footnote 13

Footnote 14

The 2016-17 Actual Spending under this program was lower than anticipated in 2016-17, as the Department received less claims for completed projects than anticipated.

Return to Footnote 14

Footnote 15

The funding profile under the Building Canada Fund-Communities Component was extended until 2019-20 for certain projects.

Return to Footnote 15

Footnote 16

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

Return to Footnote 16

Footnote 17

As a result of the 2010 Strategic Review, Infrastructure Canada saved $5.4 million on administration by improving the delivery of the BCF-CC. These funds were made available for other Government of Canada priorities, and funding for infrastructure projects remained unchanged.

Return to Footnote 17

Footnote 18

The 2016-17 Planned Spending under this program was higher than the 2016-17 Total Authorities for Use as it included additional funding that Infrastructure Canada had determined it would spend in 2016-17.

Return to Footnote 18

Footnote 19

The funding profile under the Building Canada Fund-Major Infrastructure Component was extended until 2019-20 for certain projects.

Return to Footnote 19

Footnote 20

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

Return to Footnote 20

Footnote 21

As a result of the 2010 Strategic Review, Infrastructure Canada saved $4.9 million on administration by improving the delivery of the BCF-CC. These funds were made available for other Government of Canada priorities, and funding for infrastructure projects remained unchanged.

Return to Footnote 21

Footnote 22

The 2016-17 Planned Spending under this Program included funding that Infrastructure Canada had determined it would not spend in 2016-17.

Return to Footnote 22

Footnote 23

The funding profile under the Green Infrastructure Fund was extended until 2022-23 for certain projects.

Return to Footnote 23

Footnote 24

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

Return to Footnote 24

Footnote 25

Of the $1 billion originally allocated to the GIF, $169.98 million was transferred to other federal departments to support high-priority initiatives. These departments were Natural Resources Canada ($100 million for the Forestry Industry Transformation Program), Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec ($30 million for the Temporary Initiative for the Strengthening of Quebec's Forest Economies and $18.15 million for the Natural Gas Pipeline between Vallée Jonction and Thetford Mines), and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada ($21.83 million for the Beaufort Regional Environmental Assessment). These funds were reallocated through Estimates processes prior to 2015-16.

Return to Footnote 25

Footnote 26

The 2016-17 Total Authorities Available for Use under the Green Infrastructure Fund were increased in 2016-17 by the Government as additional funding was transferred from the New Building Canada Fund-Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component-National and Regional Projects to top-up funding for the Northumberland Strait Submarine Transmission System in Prince Edward Island (PEI Cable) project.

Return to Footnote 26

Footnote 27

The funding profile under the Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway Program is provided until 2017-2018.

Return to Footnote 27

Footnote 28

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

Return to Footnote 28

Footnote 29

The 2016-17 Total Authorities Available for Use under the Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway Program were increased in 2016-17 as additional funding was needed to pay for higher than anticipated 2016-17 expenditures.

Return to Footnote 29

Footnote 30

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

Return to Footnote 30

Footnote 31

The 2016-17 Total Authorities Available for Use under the New Building Canada Fund-Provincial-Territorial Infrastructure Component-National and Regional Projects were increased by the Government in 2016-17, as additional funding was obtained through 2016-17 Supplementary Estimates processes for two projects under the Investing in Canada Plan.

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Footnote 32

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

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Footnote 33

This was the first year of the program and there was no spending in 2014-15.

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Footnote 34

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

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Footnote 35

This was the first year of the program and there was no spending in 2014-15.

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Footnote 36

The 2016-17 Actual Spending is higher than the 2016-17 Planned Spending as there were more ongoing projects under this program than anticipated.

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Footnote 37

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

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Footnote 38

As the program was approved in April 2016, there was no 2014-15 and 2015-16 Actual Spending or 2016-17 Planned Spending included in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities. Funding for this program in 2016-17 was obtained through 2016-17 Supplementary Estimates processes as part of the Investing in Canada Plan Phase 1.

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Footnote 39

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

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Footnote 40

As the program was approved in April 2016, there was no 2014-15 and 2015-16 Actual Spending or 2016-17 Planned Spending included in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities. Funding for this program in 2016-17 was obtained through 2016-17 Supplementary Estimates processes as part of the Investing in Canada Plan Phase 1.

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Footnote 41

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

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Footnote 42

As the program was approved in April 2016, there was no 2014-15 and 2015-16 Actual Spending or 2016-17 Planned Spending included in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities. Funding for this program in 2016-17 was obtained through 2016-17 Supplementary Estimates processes as part of the Investing in Canada Plan Phase 1.

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Footnote 43

Fiscal year in which the terms and conditions were last approved, continued or amended by Treasury Board or the Minister.

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Footnote 44

As the program was approved in April 2016, there was no 2014-15 and 2015-16 Actual Spending or2016-17 Planned Spending included in the 2016-17 Report on Plans and Priorities. Funding for this program in 2016-17 was obtained through 2016-17 Supplementary Estimates processes as part of the Investing in Canada Plan Phase 1.

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Footnote 45

The Enabling Accessibility Fund received a top-up of $4M over 2 years starting in 2016-2017 from Budget 2016 Social Infrastructure Funding Phase I. The $4M was all grants and contributions funding, no new operating funding was sought for Phase I. The operating requirements for Phase 1 were funded (absorbed) through existing reference levels.

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Footnote 46

This figure represents the actual expenditures made during fiscal year 2016-2017 while the figure in the narrative represents the value of agreements signed ($46,975,420).

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Footnote 47

Budget 2016 announced $16.6 million in funding for the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative in 2016-2017, and $100 million in new funding in 2017-2018 towards Indigenous Early Learning and Child Care, and of this amount, a proportion was allocated to First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative. Per the Treasury Board submissions, the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative Social Infrastructure Funding contribution allocations are as follows: Phase I: 2016-2017: $16,000,000, Phase 2: 2017-2018: $44,359,362, Total: $60,359,362.

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Footnote 48

This figure represents the combined internal services allocation for the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative ($2,440,638) and the Homelessness Partnering Strategy ($4,751,951). Per the Treasury Board submissions, the First Nations and Inuit Child Care Initiative internal services allocations are as follows (including amount for Shared Services Canada IT costs): Phase I: 2016-2017: 600,000. Phase 2: 2017-2018: $1,840,638. Total: $2,440,638.

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Footnote 49

This figure represents internal services actual spending for fiscal year 2016-17 for the Homelessness Partnering Strategy only.

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Endnotes

Endnote i

Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals: https://www.canada.ca/en/environmental-assessment-agency/programs/strategic-environmental-assessment/cabinet-directive-environmental-assessment-policy-plan-program-proposals.html

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