ARCHIVED - Building for Prosperity: Public Infrastructure in Canada - What We Invest In

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What We Invest In

The majority of Infrastructure Canada's funding commitments under targeted programs fall into six major investment categories.

Major Category Federal Investments* ($ billions)
Transportation $3.93
Green Infrastructure (incl. wastewater) $2.09
Public Transit $2.55
Sports and Recreation $0.93
Drinking Water $0.81
Culture and Tourism $0.68

Target Funding by Major Category*

Target Funding by Major Category*

* Includes Building Canada Fund – Major Infrastructure Component, Building Canada Fund – Communities Component, Infrastructure Stimulus Fund and Green Infrastructure Fund

Federal Funding by Jurisdiction**

Province/Territory Federal Funds $M
British Columbia 2,667
Alberta 2,069
Saskatchewan 766
Manitoba 815
Ontario 7,411
Quebec 4,779
New Brunswick 642
Nova Scotia 720
Prince Edward Island 287
Newfoundland and Labrador 490
Yukon 316
Northwest Territories 249
Nunavut 245

** Totals include:

  • Total commitments under Building Canada Fund – Major Infrastructure Component, Building Canada Fund – Communities Component, Infrastructure Stimulus Fund and Green Infrastructure Fund (since 2007)
  • Total allocations under the Provincial-Territorial Base Fund (2007-08 to 2013-14)
  • Total allocations under the Gas Tax Fund (2007-08 to 2011-12)

Community Investments

While these investments certainly add up to a more prosperous country, the biggest impact they have is at home in our communities, as the following projects show.

Resolving Water Quality Issues: Rocky View, AB

Located in the foothills just west of Calgary, residents in the Bragg Creek area coped for years with boil-water orders and drinking water that had to be trucked in from Calgary. With no form of water treatment in the community, shallow wells drawing water from the nearby Elbow River were always at risk. Now, public infrastructure investments are helping to build a new potable water treatment plant.

Brownfield Remediation: Harvey, NB

In the small village of Harvey, southwest of Fredericton, an abandoned wood mill had become a public danger, with rotting piles of cedar posing a fire hazard. The community also faced the threat of the abandoned mill operations contaminating the village's water supply. Public infrastructure investments in brownfield remediation turned a derelict site in the centre of town into a space that can be used by the community.

Promoting Canadian Culture: Baie-Comeau, QC

The City of Baie-Comeau now has a large-scale cultural centre thanks to funding from the federal Infrastructure Stimulus Fund. The Centre des arts de Baie-Comeau provides space for dance and music classes, rehearsals and outreach programs. The venue has the capacity to host artists in residence to support the creation of new works, and its new performance hall can be configured to accommodate large or small crowds. The facility, which also houses municipal library services, is a valuable addition to community.

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