2014 New Building Canada Fund: National Infrastructure Component
Project Business Case Guide for Proposed Projects
Annex A – Overview Of NIC Category-Specific Requirements

Highways and Major Roads

1. Highways and Major Roads Objective

To invest in highways and major roads that are nationally significant, have broad public benefits, and that contribute to long-term economic growth and prosperity.

2. Highways and Major Roads Subcategories

New construction, additional capacity, or rehabilitation of highways and major roads, including bridges and tunnels that are:

  • Key interprovincial or international corridors, or new construction projected to carry significant volumes (defined below) of freight and/or passenger traffic; or
  • Highways or roads that provide access to border crossings or to facilities such as ports, airports, railway intermodal yards, or intermodal/multi-modal/transfer facilities or logistics parks;
  • Highways or roads related to major natural resource development opportunities; or
  • A road-rail grade separation on one of the above highways or major roads.

Notes to Highways and Major Roads Subcategories:

  • Projects under this category could include Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) components as part of the overall project.
  • 'Significant volumes' will be normally defined as projects for which at least one segment meets the following:
    • a highway outside a census metropolitan area (CMA) that has an average annual daily traffic (AADT) value of at least 5,000; or
    • an urban road corridor within a CMA with a minimum of 50,000 AADT.
  • Rehabilitation projects must meet the definition of 'rehabilitation' as agreed upon by the Council of Ministers in 2005.

3. Highways and Major Roads Outcomes and Benefits for Canadians

These projects support one or more of the following outcomes:

  • Increasing efficiency and mobility by supporting efforts to reduce congestion, effectively manage traffic volume, reduce travel time and improve productivity;
  • Improving safety;
  • Improving access for remote areas affected by resource development-related activity, and/or improved social and economic outcomes in affected communities;
  • Extending the life of the existing asset.

4. Highways and Major Roads Minimum Federal Requirements

  • Proponent must demonstrate the economic advantages and the broader public benefits of the project.
  • Proponents must demonstrate that projects are compatible with official transportation plans or other strategies.
  • Proponents must demonstrate that their proposal is based on current demand (e.g., significant volumes of traffic and/or trucks), and if projects are intended to expand existing assets or build new assets, the intended results must be substantiated.
  • If the project includes an ITS component or system, that the ITS component or system is compliant with the ITS Architecture for Canada and the Border Information Flow Architecture, or expand in new areas of national interest.

Public Transit

1. Public Transit Objective

To invest in public transit, specifically rapid transit systems, that are nationally significant, have broad public benefits, and that contribute to long-term economic growth and prosperity.

2. Public Transit Subcategories

New construction, expansion, rehabilitation or material enhancement of rapid transit systems including bus rapid transit (BRT), light rail transit (LRT), and heavy rail transit (e.g., subways and regional commuter rail).

Notes to Public Transit Subcategories:

  • Projects under this category could include supporting transit capital infrastructure and rolling stock. Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) technologies may only be included as a component of a broader rapid transit system project.

3. Public Transit Outcomes and Benefits for Canadians

The project must demonstrate how it provides benefits to Canadians in support of one or more of the following outcomes:

  • Increase efficiency and mobility by supporting efforts to reduce urban congestion, reduce travel time and improve productivity;
  • Increasing transit ridership;
  • Improving safety; or
  • Improving mobility (e.g. improved access, reduced travel times).

4. Public Transit Minimum Federal Requirements

  • Proponents must demonstrate the economic advantages and the broader public benefits of the project.
  • Rapid transit system projects must be part of an official, integrated land-use and transportation development plan or strategy. Where applicable, projects must be consistent with the approved plans of regional transportation bodies.
  • Proponents must demonstrate that their proposal is based on current or projected demand and the intended results must be substantiated.
  • If the project includes an ITS component or system, that the ITS component or system is compliant with the ITS Architecture for Canada.

Rail Infrastructure

1. Rail Infrastructure Objective

To invest in rail freight infrastructure that is nationally significant, has broad public benefits, and contributes to long-term economic growth and prosperity.

2. Rail Infrastructure Subcategories

New construction, additional capacity or rehabilitation of the following capitalized and fixed rail infrastructure, excluding regular or deferred maintenance:

  • Major rail bridges and tunnels

Notes to Rail Infrastructure Subcategories:

  • Projects under this category could include Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) components as part of the overall project.
  • Road/rail grade separations would also be an eligible subcategory of investment under the National Infrastructure Component – Highways and Major Roads category.

3. Rail Infrastructure Outcomes and Benefits for Canadians

The project must demonstrate how it provides national benefits in support of one or more of the following outcomes:

  • Increasing efficiency and mobility by supporting efforts to reduce congestion and effectively manage traffic volume (e.g., reduce travel time on key interprovincial and international trade corridors)
  • Improving safety

4. Rail Infrastructure Minimum Federal Requirements

  • Proponent must demonstrate the economic advantages and the broader public benefits of the project.
  • Proponent must demonstrate that they do not stand to benefit unfairly from a significant market privilege upon the project's completion.
  • Proponents must demonstrate that their proposal is based on current demand (e.g., significant volumes of rail traffic), and if projects are intended to expand existing assets or build new assets, the intended results must be substantiated.
  • If the project includes an ITS component or system, that the ITS component or system is compliant with the ITS Architecture for Canada and the Border Information Flow Architecture, or expand in new areas of national interest.

Local and Regional Airports

1. Local and Regional Airports Objective

To invest in airports that are nationally significant, have broad public benefits, and contribute to long-term economic growth and prosperity.

2. Local and Regional Airports Subcategories

New construction, additional capacity, and/or rehabilitation of the following capitalized and fixed airport infrastructure assets supporting freight and/or passenger movements:

  • Runways;
  • Taxiways;
  • Aprons; and
  • Air terminal buildings

Notes to Local and Regional Airports Subcategories:

  • Projects under this category could include Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) components as part of the overall project.
  • Federally-owned airports and federal assets are not eligible for funding.
  • Safety and security projects that are eligible for funding under Priorities 1 and 2 categories of Transport Canada's Airports Capital Assistance Program (ACAP) are funded under that program, and are not eligible for funding unless they are part of a larger project.
    ACAP priorities 1 and 2 may be described as:
    Priority 1: Safety-related airside projects required to accommodate the aircraft providing year-round, regularly scheduled passenger service such as rehabilitation of runways, taxiways, aprons, associated lighting, visual aids, sand storage sheds, utilities to service eligible items, related site preparation costs including directly associated environmental costs, aircraft firefighting equipment and equipment shelters which are necessary to maintain the airport's level of protection as required by regulation.
    Priority 2: Heavy airside mobile equipment (safety-related) such as runway snow blowers, runway snowplows, runway sweepers, spreaders, winter friction testing devices, and heavy airside mobile equipment shelters.

3. Local and Regional Airports Outcomes and Benefits for Canadians

The project must demonstrate it provides benefits to Canadians in support of one or more of the following outcomes:

  • Improving efficiency (e.g. increased traffic volumes, passenger volumes, cargo); or
  • Improving safety.

4. Local and Regional Airports Minimum Federal Requirements

  • Proponents must demonstrate the economic advantages and the broader public benefits of the project.
  • Proponents must demonstrate financial support from provincial and/or regional/local governments by meeting the following criteria:
    • For local and/or regional assets, local/regional government interests must furnish at least one-third (33.33 per cent) of the total project costs;
    • For projects in the territories, with the exception of for-profit private sector projects, the federal government will cost-share up to 75 per cent of total eligible costs.
  • For non-provincial assets, a municipal council resolution in support of Airport projects must be submitted.
  • Proponents must demonstrate that projects are consistent with long-term regional development plans and provide significant economic benefits across the region.
  • Proponents must demonstrate that projects do not negatively impact other airports in their vicinity and the overall provision of airport and air transportation services in the region, and demonstrate broad public benefits.
  • If the project includes an ITS component or system, that the ITS component or system is compliant with the ITS Architecture for Canada and the Border Information Flow Architecture, or expand in new areas of national interest.

Port Infrastructure

1. Port Infrastructure Objective

To invest in marine ports that are nationally significant, have broad public benefits, and contribute to long-term economic growth and prosperity.

2. Port Infrastructure Subcategories

  • New construction, additional capacity, and rehabilitation of the following capitalized and fixed infrastructure assets located at ports;
    • Wharves and associated infrastructure;
    • Road and rail infrastructure;
    • Intermodal, multimodal, and/or transfer facilities.
  • New construction, additional capacity, and rehabilitation of the following capitalized and fixed infrastructure assets located at inland ports (logistics parks), defined below:
    • Road and rail infrastructure;
    • Intermodal, multimodal, and/or transfer facilities.

Notes to Port Infrastructure Subcategories:

  • Projects under this category could include Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) components and/or capital dredging as a part of the overall project.
  • Infrastructure that supports passenger-only ferry services, the maintenance of existing facilities, or maintenance activities (including dredging), are not eligible for funding.
  • Inland ports are to be generally defined as specialized intermodal sites that facilitate the transfer of freight between different modes of transportation, and the processing of national or international trade, creating a more central distribution point. Infrastructure that supports facilities for storage and consolidation of goods, and maintenance for road or rail cargo carriers are not eligible for funding.

3. Port Infrastructure Outcomes and Benefits for Canadians

The project must demonstrate how it provides benefits to Canadians in support of the following outcomes:

  • Improving efficiency and capacity (e.g. increased traffic volumes and freight capacity, trade flows, new shippers);
  • Improving safety.

4. Port Infrastructure Minimum Federal Requirements

  • Proponent must demonstrate the economic advantages as well as the broader public benefits of the project.
  • Project must be supported by any federal departments that would be implicated by the proposed project.
  • Proponents must demonstrate that their proposal is based on current demand (e.g., trade volumes of national significance), and if projects are intended to expand facilities/capacity or build new assets, they must substantiate the intended results.
  • If the project includes an ITS component or system, that the ITS component or system is compliant with the ITS Architecture for Canada and the Border Information Flow Architecture, or expand in new areas of national interest.

Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS)

1. Intelligent Transportation Systems Objective

Support the deployment of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) technologies that have broad public benefits and that contribute to long-term economic growth and prosperity.

2. Intelligent Transportation Systems Subcategories

  • Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) projects for all modes of transportation including but not limited to smart card technology, traffic management technology and transponder technology
  • Associated equipment, integrated systems and capitalized facilities and structures

Note to Intelligent Transportation Systems Subcategories:

  • Projects must be compliant with the Intelligent Transportation System Architecture for Canada and the Border Information Flow Architecture.

3. Intelligent Transportation Systems Outcomes and Benefits for Canadians

The project must demonstrate how it provides national benefits in support of one or more of the following outcomes:

  • Increasing efficiency and capacity of the national transportation system by supporting efforts to reduce congestion, effectively manage traffic volume, and reduce travel time
  • Improving safety

4. Intelligent Transportation Systems Minimum Federal Requirements

  • Proponent must demonstrate the economic advantages and the broader public benefits of the project.
  • The ITS component or system must be compliant with the ITS Architecture for Canada and/or the Border Information Flow Architecture.

Disaster Mitigation Infrastructure

1. Disaster Mitigation Infrastructure Objective

To invest in disaster mitigation infrastructure that is nationally significant, has broad public benefits, and that contributes to long-term economic growth and prosperity.

2. Disaster Mitigation Infrastructure Subcategories

Construction, modification, reinforcement or relocation of public infrastructure that protects from, prevents, reduces the impact and/or likelihood of, or mitigates the potential damage resulting from natural hazards, including impacts or events related to climate change.

Note to Disaster Mitigation Infrastructure Subcategories:

  • Construction, modification or reinforcement of public infrastructure excludes normal routine, maintenance and operational work (e.g., dredging of sediment, gravel removal, debris traps, etc.). The relocation of entire communities is also excluded.

3. Disaster Mitigation Infrastructure Outcomes and Benefits for Canadians

The project must demonstrate how it provides benefits to Canadians in support of one or more of the following outcomes:

  • Reducing the social, physical and/or economic risks associated with natural hazards and/or adverse effects related to climate change
  • Improving the resiliency of public infrastructure to natural hazards and/or adverse effects related to climate change
  • Supporting an all-hazard risk assessment and related mitigation plan to address disaster risks

4. Disaster Mitigation Infrastructure Minimum Federal Requirements

  • Proponent must demonstrate the economic advantages and the broader public benefits of the project.
  • The project proponent must have conducted a risk assessment that supports the proposed mitigation project. The risk assessment shall include: the likelihood of a natural hazard occurring and the potential impacts of such an event (including social, economic and environmental impacts).
  • The proponent must demonstrate that the project is the most cost-effective mitigation approach, including other structural and non-structural mitigation options.
  • The proponent must demonstrate that project design has taken into consideration the increasing magnitude of natural hazards and any "down-stream" negative consequences of the structural mitigation project.
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